ice cover

ice cover

[′īs ‚kəv·ər]
(oceanography)
References in periodicals archive ?
Jeff Severinghaus, a paleoclimatologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography who was not involved in the study, said in the statement: "We can now reject some of the lowest sea-level projections, because the models underpinning them assume continuous ice cover during the last million years."
From a human perspective, changes in the sea ice cover and resulting changes of important habitats have an impact on indigenous populations whose livelihoods are intertwined with the changing polar seasons and the existence of sea ice.
In addition to our regular Ice Fishing Guide, which covers tactics and techniques to catch everything that swims under ice cover, we're adding an exclusive issue that covers noteworthy new lures, tackle, and other ice paraphernalia critical to being effective and having fun on the ice.
Recent research in sub-Arctic waters has shown that calcified algae on underwater rocks have layers similar to tree rings that reveal past changes in sea ice cover. Researchers working in the Labrador Sea studied samples of the alga Clathromorphum compactum, a type of coralline algae also found in Arctic waters.
-- Water levels in the Great Lakes are expected to continue a steady recovery this year, courtesy of widespread ice cover that is slowing evaporation and snowfall that has approached record amounts in some cities, federal experts said Wednesday.
Smith said that their study predicts that it will soon reverse its present trend and experience major drops in ice cover in summer, which, along with decreased mixing of the vertical column, will extend the season of phytoplankton growth, asserting that these changes will substantially alter the area's pristine food web.
As of Thursday, ice cover extended across 88 percent, according to the federal government's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory in Ann Arbor.
Researchers from the University of Alaska at Fairbanks have identified 150,000 methane seeps in Alaska and Greenland in lakes along the margins of ice cover, and scientists writing in Nature Geoscience warn that this ancient gas could have a significant impact on climate change.
On average permanent ice cover in the mouth of the Gulf of Finland forms by 10 February, and ice disappears from the gulf during mid-April (Seina & Peltola 1991).