ice field


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

ice field

1. a very large flat expanse of ice floating in the sea; large ice floe
2. a large mass of ice permanently covering an extensive area of land

ice field

[′īs ‚fēld]
(hydrology)
A mass of land ice resting on a mountain region and covering all but the highest peaks.
(oceanography)
A flat sheet of sea ice that is more than 5 miles (8 kilometers) across.
References in periodicals archive ?
(https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-49149441) In an interview with BBC , Labedz commented that while on a trip to the ice field in Alaska, she just thought it would be fun and would resonate with other scientists.
where: [v.sub.max] is maximum 1% probability of water flow under the ice, m/ s, during the drifting of the ice; [v.sub.w,max] is maximum wind velocity of 1% probability, m/s, during the drifting of the ice; [L.sub.m] is average length of the ice field in the direction of flow, taken according to the data of field investigations; when not available, for rivers it is allowed to take [L.sub.m] = 3[B.sub.r], where [B.sub.r] is river width m
Ernest Hemingway made the ice field of Mount Kilimanjaro famous in his 1936 story, "The Snows of Kilimanjaro." The beauty of the mountain and whiteness of its ice struck him, and he immortalized what he saw: "As wide as all the world, great, high, and unbelievably white in the sun, was the square top of Kilimanjaro" (56).
An increasingly dry regional atmosphere, for example, is starving the mountain of the fresh snow needed to sustain the ice fields.
ATHABASCA GLACIER, CANADA: Part of the Canadian Rockies' Columbia Ice field, a system of glaciers that straddles the Continental Divide, the Athabasca Glacier has already lost half its volume and continues to recede.
* The San Rafael Glacier, one of the major glaciers of the Northern Patagonian Ice Field where Aberystwyth scientists did their research
Calls to ICE field offices often didn't work, they have said.
The male hikers are reported to have fallen into an ice field near 9,000 feet high Pico de Frondiellas in the region of Sallent de Gallego, with a third man in their party escaping unharmed.
They are thought to have fallen into an ice field near 9,000 feet high Pico de Frondiellas in Sallent de Gallego, north east Spain.
When an ice field begins to move, it has become a glacier.
To conduct this work, GAO reviewed ICE manuals, memorandums, and removal data, interviewed ICE officials, and visited 21 of 75 ICE field offices.