ice field

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ice field

1. a very large flat expanse of ice floating in the sea; large ice floe
2. a large mass of ice permanently covering an extensive area of land

ice field

[′īs ‚fēld]
(hydrology)
A mass of land ice resting on a mountain region and covering all but the highest peaks.
(oceanography)
A flat sheet of sea ice that is more than 5 miles (8 kilometers) across.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2000, a group of natural scientists from the United States, Russia, and Switzerland conducted detailed investigations on the ice fields of Mount Kilimanjaro in order to study its past and present conditions (Thompson et al.
Kimberly Casey, a glaciologist based at the US space agency's Goddard Space Flight Centre, who visited the mountain earlier this year, also noticed Kilimanjaro's north ice field had separated.
MOUNTAIN GLACIERS: These glaciers develop in high mountainous regions, often flowing out of ice fields that span several peaks or even a mountain range.
Experts from the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) said while there has been excellent monitoring of glacial trends in Europe and North America, the fate of ice fields in Central Asia and the tropics have been largely overlooked.
As punishment for her newly acquired strawberry tattoo, Zanna has to spend the summer with her twin brother Martin and father on the ice fields of Last Chance Pass, Alberta instead of with her mother in Paris.
She has travelled the world, from the ice fields of Everest to Morocco and Brazil.
A luxury liner cruising graciously through the ice fields of somewhere or other.
She now holds the record as the oldest woman to reach the magnetic North Pole by foot, and, having seen her hauling her sled across ice fields in subzero temperatures at the age of 62, no one needs to tell me that age is no barrier to achievement.
Among the greatest fears scientists have about global warming is that it will cause the massive ice fields of Greenland and other locales at the northern end of the Gulf Stream to melt rapidly, sending surges of cold water into the ocean system and interrupting the flow of the Ocean Conveyor Belt.
The blue ice fields on the Western side of the area have been identified as a possible collecting ground for meteorites that fall further inland.
The way in which ice fields were marked for plowing is reminiscent of check planting techniques of the era.