ice fog


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Related to ice fog: Freezing fog

ice fog

[′īs ‚fäg]
(meteorology)
A type of fog composed of suspended particles of ice, partly ice crystals 20-100 micrometers in diameter but chiefly, especially when dense, droxtals 12-20 micrometers in diameter; occurs at very low temperatures and usually in clear, calm weather in high latitudes. Also known as frost flakes; frost fog; frozen fog; ice-crystal fog; pogonip; rime fog.

ice fog

A radiation fog consisting of ice crystals, formed under conditions of clear skies, very low temperatures, and little or no wind. The fog may cause a halo. Sometimes called a frost fog.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three ice fog events (16,17, and 21 January) observed during this time period occurred at temperature <-30[degrees]C where RH was close to 100%.
This table shows that ice fog occurred about 14 times (visibility <10 km) during the FRAM-IF project.
During fog-free conditions, the spectra from both sensors indicated a smooth continuation (not shown); however, during ice fog conditions, the Climatronic Aerosol Profiler spectra shifted to the right over larger size ranges (size >0.
For larger particle sizes (>10 [micro]m), the Ground Cloud Imaging Probe images and spectral measurements during the project clearly indicated ice fog existence but fog crystal shapes could not be clearly discriminated.
se] are plotted against each other for an ice fog event (Fig.
The model postprocessor calculates visibility using the extinction as a function of cloud ice water content (Stoelinga and Warner 1999); however, this tends to underestimate the ice fog water content.
If both ice water content and ice crystal number concentration can be known from a forecasting model at each time step, then ice fog visibility can be predicted.
Ice fog occurs very often (~14%) in the northern latitudes when temperatures go below -15[degrees].
Ice fog crystals can be as small as 5-10 [micro]m and usually have sizes less than 200 [micro]m.