ice front


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ice front

[′īs ‚frənt]
(hydrology)
The floating vertical cliff forming the seaward face or edge of an ice shelf or other glacier that enters water.
References in periodicals archive ?
McGinnis (1968) used crustal tilt data in calculations to predict the amount of theoretical forebulge that occurs at the edge of an ice front. The tilt data were derived from both inferred relative vertical movements of North American glacial lake shorelines and measurements of Greenland sub-ice profiles.
"This is the furthest back that the ice front has been in recorded history.
The main rift in Antarctica that was discovered late in 2016 is spreading and now the rift in the Larsen C ice shelf has a second branch moving toward the ice front.
"When it calves, the Larsen C Ice Shelf will lose more than 10 percent of its area to leave the ice front at its most retreated position ever recorded; this event will fundamentally change the landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula.
This may have been possible if the ice front stagnated or the blocks could have been washed out during a glacial flood or "jokulhaup".
Most of the ice front was bordered by a strip of tundra a few to 100 miles wide.
Contacts remained erratic, but in February 2007, via an undercover ICE front company in Europe, Ardebili sent an "urgent request" for hi-tech gyroscopes used in advanced aircraft and missiles, and "phase shifter" chips that electronically control guidance and target acquisition systems.
The position of the ice front off Newfoundland and Labrador was measured as the latitude of the most southerly extent of ice between 50-55[degrees] W on 1 February each year during 1969-2005.
As the ice front advances, it gradually edges the walrus across the feeding ground.
Go back a relatively short 18,000 years to the last Ice Age, when the ice front apparently stopped just short of us (north of Leeds) and left us with tundra-like icy-cold and a landscape fit only for "arctic" life.
A comparison of the ice front of Stephenson Glacier (which terminates in a 113 m deep lagoon) using a high resolution satellite image taken in January 2003, showed a retreat of nearly 200 m; a dramatic change for just a one-year period.
A few museum highlights worth noting are the island's only wolf, which apparently braved a crossing over the sea ice front Siberia only to be shot, stuffed and encased as an exhibit, Japanese samurai swords and copies of Russian and Soviet documents that not-so-subtly fuel the flames of the dispute between Russia and Japan over possession of the South Kuril Islands.