ice jam

ice jam

[′īs ‚jam]
(hydrology)
An accumulation of broken river ice caught in a narrow channel, frequently producing local floods during a spring breakup.
Fields of lake or sea ice thawed loose from the shores in early spring, and blown against the shore, sometimes exerting great pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now that the drip-drip of rumors, then allegations, about dirty jokes, "crass language" and what a good employment lawyer might call sexual harassment has started pouring out like the Pemigewasset after an ice jam breaks, the chickens have come home to roost for AS, a man who has never been exactly at the top of too many senators' guest lists.
Ice-jam floods occur in the PAD when conditions are appropriate for causing a "hydraulic dam" of ice, which backs up and raises water levels upstream of the ice jam (Peters and Prowse, 2001; Peters et al, 2006; Peters and Buttle, 2010).
The force [F.sub.b,j], MN, which is formed when pier cuts ice jam, is calculated according to the following equation:
Long cold spells can also cause the surface of rivers to freeze, leading to ice jams. An ice jam occurs when a rise in the water level or a thaw breaks the ice into large chunks, which become jammed at man-made and natural obstructions and can result in severe flooding.
Caption: A sketch of the proposed over- look onto the Little River will likely be destroyed when the ice jam causes the ice to freeze and flow over into the park, which it does about twice per winter.
UNION - A one-mile stretch of Highway 203 reopened Wednesday after it was closed Tuesday night because of flooding caused by an ice jam at Catherine Creek.
In May 2013, a stubborn ice jam on the Yukon River sent floodwater spilling over its banks into the small Alaskan town of Galena.
Responders said most residents of Galena were evacuated after a 30-mile (48-kilometer) ice jam on the Yukon River caused rapid flooding in the community of almost 500.
The first detailed account of Missouri River flooding occurred in 1881 when an ice jam break flooded northeastern Nebraska.
The flow was halted over the falls on March 30, 1848, due to an ice jam in the upper river.
The flow was also halted over the falls on March 30, 1848 due to an ice jam in the upper river.
An ice jam blocking the Niagara River made the famous waterfall stop flowing for 30 hours on March 28, 1848.