ice load

ice load

[′īs ‚lōd]
(engineering)
The weight of glaze deposited on an overhead wire in a power supply system; standard safety codes require allowance for ½-inch (12.7-millimeter) radial thickness in heavy loading districts and ¼-inch (6.35-millimeter) in medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equation (3) shows the ICE torque divided into ICE load torque and ICE friction torque.
Heavy snow or ice load can weigh down branches, causing fractures of limbs.
The ice load downed numerous trees, branches, and power lines which resulted in widespread power outages.
This results in a reduction of 25% of the total ice load.
They can withstand 100-mile-an-hour winds and take a half-inch ice load.
Concentrations of certain elements in the rock suggest that mantle melting doubled when the ice load disappeared, they report.
Among the topics are projected future climate changes in the context of geological and geomorphological hazards, evidence from Sicily's Mount Etna for climate change and collapsing volcanoes, multiple effects of ice load changes and associated stress change on magmatic systems, whether El Nino--southern oscillation influences earthquake activity in the eastern tropical Pacific, high-mountain slope failures and recent and future warm extreme events, and a view from the Palaeogene on methane hydrate instability.
Oren suggests that higher carbon-dioxide levels may have induced the trees to reshape their tops, making them thicker and thus better able to withstand the ice load without breaking.
The hull is equipped with an Ice Load Monitoring System, which measures ice loads from the hull and offers online support to the officers ensuring safe operations.
However, other incident scenarios related to cold weather repeatedly described in PHMSA's reportable incident database include icing of pressure and control equipment and damaged equipment caused by falling snow and ice loads.