ice mine

ice mine

[′īs ‚mīn]
(ordnance)
A waterproof mine placed in or under the ice, detonated by a pressure device on the surface to break up river or lake ice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Appelfeld's novel The Ice Mine mentions in passing the similar dreams of prisoners in a Nazi concentration camp (94).
A different motivation for minimizing the representation of consciousness is most prominent in Agota Kristof's novel Le Grand Cahier and, to a lesser degree, in Appelfeld's Holocaust and post-Holocaust novels Searing Light and The Ice Mine. In these literary works, the "we" group (or "we" couple in Kristof) helps the individual survive in extreme conditions.
They can be the members of a kibbutz (as in Oz's novel Elsewhere Perhaps and his short stories "A Hollow Stone," "Where the Jackals Howl," and "Nomad and Viper"); a group of soldiers in the Israeli army (Smilansky's stories; Yitzhak Laor's novel The People, Food Fit for A King; Oz's "The Trappist Monastery"); Holocaust prisoners, survivors and refugees (Appelfeld's novels Searing Light and The Ice Mine and his story "Cold Spring"); a convoy of Jews heading toward Jerusalem (Appelfeld'd Laish); a family or part of a family (Moshe Shamir's "The Fish Grillers," Smilansky's "The Escapade" and "A Story That Did Not Begin"); a group of travelers (Smilansky's "Running by the Sea"); and the inhabitants of an imaginary or undefined place (Abraham B.
(25) In Appelfeld's novels, the narrator and the other characters subsumed under the pronoun "we" are prisoners of the Nazi concentration camps (in The Ice Mine) and refugees, Holocaust survivors (in Searing Light), whose existence is endangered both internally (for example, by ideological disputes) and externally (by various kinds of disease and fatal dangers).
Those who fall into despair are sooner or later expelled from the group, which feels threatened and acts in self-defense (Searing 108; Ice Mine 10-15).
The 1990s have produced, besides Appelfeld's The Ice Mine and Laish, a few fictional narratives in which "we" narration is mingled with narration in the first person singular and in the second person.