ice sheet


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Related to ice sheet: Laurentide ice sheet

ice sheet

[′īs ‚shēt]
(hydrology)
A thick glacier, more than 19,300 square miles (50,000 square kilometers) in area, forming a cover of ice and snow that is continuous over a land surface and moving outward in all directions. Also known as ice mantle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ice Sheet is of great interest to geoscientists due to its size and northern location, which means that it reacts quickly and dynamically to climate change.
And, of course, that's going to increase the drainage of the Greenland ice sheet and contribute to rising sea level," he said.
Acting like glacial conveyor belts, tidewater glaciers are the primary mechanism for draining ice sheet interiors by delivering icebergs to the ocean.
But a Nasa team was surprised when they lowered a video camera to get the first long look at the underbelly of the ice sheet in Antarctica.
Research has shown the 1.7 million kilometre square ice sheet could melt entirely over several thousand years if temperatures continue to rise unchecked, causing sea level rises of up to seven metres.
That means global temperatures may have a much faster effect on the formation of ice sheets than previously thought.
The lake covered 5.7sqkm near the western edge of the ice sheet and took about 24 hours to drain.
"If the trends we're seeing continue and climate warming continues as predicted, the polar ice sheets could change dramatically," said Jay Zwally, lead author of a new, comprehensive NASA satellite survey.
But sophisticated new measurements made by two orbiting satellites have shown the ice sheet is slowly melting away.
During that time, the scientists predict that half of the Arctic's summer sea ice will melt, along with much of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which contains enough ice to raise sea level by some 23 feet.
He declared with particular reference to the Permian glacials present in the tropics of India and Africa, that 'it will now be necessary to explain not only the former presence of the great ice sheet in the tropics but marked alternations of seasons too.' Any theory of glaciation, Coleman wrote in 1926, 'must account for a world-wide refrigeration affecting all zones of both hemispheres at the same time' (p.