ice wedge


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ice wedge

[′īs ‚wej]
(hydrology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Titled "In Situ Field Sequencing and Life Detection in Remote (79A[degrees]26a[sup.2]N) Canadian High Arctic Permafrost Ice Wedge Microbial Communities," (https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2017.02594/full) the study appeared online Saturday in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology.
Ice wedge is the ice filling frost fissure, as well as other cracks in the field of permafrost.
Extending the barware theme, Corkcicle has introduced the Whiskey Wedge glass, which features a silicone mold that makes an ice wedge right in the glass intended to keep whiskey perfectly chilled without watering it down.
The ice wedge is created in a silicone Origins Clear Body Scrub, PS26, origins.co.uk and department stores.
Cracking may occur again and again, gradually building up an ice wedge. When the climate warms, the ice wedge melts, and sediment begins to fill the fissure.
For nine pedons (6.5%), the field criteria were insufficient to identify the surface of the transition zone, and for 22 pedons (15%) the presence of an ice wedge at depth made identification difficult.
This locality (the Foraker Ice Wedge site) was resampled during our field season in 1990, in addition to another exposure about 200 m upstream (the Foraker Slump site).
In the 2000s, the researchers collected subsurface brine that was trapped beneath the ice wedges. This water was in a liquid state, because of the sheer amount of salt dissolved in it.
The origin of underground ice is discussed, including the burial of glaciers, the creation of ice through cryosuction, ice injection, and through the growth of ice wedges that may lead to the formation of yedoma, a Russian term for ice complex.
Usually, holes form in winter when ice wedges in cracks and expands.