ideal gas law


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ideal gas law

[ī′dēl ′gas ‚lȯ]
(thermodynamics)
The equation of state of an ideal gas which is a good approximation to real gases at sufficiently high temperatures and low pressures; that is, PV = RT, where P is the pressure, V is the volume per mole of gas, T is the temperature, and R is the gas constant.
References in periodicals archive ?
where Cm is the total concentration of the gas mixture given as P/RT by the ideal gas law. Thus, equation (2) can be written otherwise as [7]:
After each integration step, the cylinder gas temperature is deduced from the ideal gas law.
The ideal gas law can then be used to calculate the mass flow into the air capacitor [18].
The point can be made by first examining the ideal gas law and then, a result from the inappropriate application of the virial theorem.
I ask a series of questions based on data from previous lab investigations and from class discussions to have students develop the mathematical expression of the Ideal Gas Law. In their lab groups, students are asked to combine all variables from previously studied gas laws into one equation, PV = nRT.
Alternative approaches to the sizing formulas were attempted by the authors of this paper, but all efforts yielded that the ideal gas law used by Lockhart and Carlson was the most appropriate.
The scandal over underinflated footballs kicked off a teachable moment about the ideal gas law (SN Online: 6/18/15).
The gas inside the bubble is based on ideal gas law and there is thermodynamic equilibrium at all times at the gas-liquid interface according to gas concentration (Henry law).
The F&E approach is based on physical laws in terms of mass and energy conservation as well as the ideal gas law in differential form, which result in ordinary differential equations (ODEs) [9, 11, 18].
Wandering through the rows of students seated on laboratory stools, I expounded the virtues of the Ideal Gas Law and how it expressed the relationship between pressure, volume and temperature in the reality of our everyday atmospheric conditions.
First, it specifies the range of pressures that the Ideal Gas Law suggests the balls could have read given the temperature change from indoors to outdoors.