identity operator


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identity operator

[ī′den·ə‚dē ‚äp·ə‚rād·ər]
(mathematics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be seen that both of scattering operator and translation operator have the combination of L and [+ or -] (1/2) [I.sup.r] + K operators instead of using identity operator. So when using conventional Galerkin's scheme and RWG function to discretize the scattering and translation operators, this will lead to a more accuracy result [10].
First we note the fundamental difference between equations JMSIE and EHSIE, namely only the first one can lead to integral equations of the second kind, since the second one contains the rotation operator n x rather than the identity operator.
For g [equivalent to] I, the identity operator, Definition 2.1 reduces to the definition of partially relaxed strongly monotonicity, monotonicity and pseudomonotonicity of the bifunction F(*,*).
where [I.sub.2] is the identity operator on [H.sub.2].
Let I be the identity operator on [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
* Identity operator: Considering the identity operator I, it is obvious that
If g = I, the identity operator, then general variational inequality (2.6) is equivalent to finding u [member of] K such that
The linear space FL(V) is an algebra with identity I (the identity operator on Y), the multiplication being composition of operators.
Several "right" inverses [D.sup.-1.sub.q] of the Askey-Wilson divided difference operator, such that [D.sup.-1.sub.q] [D.sub.q] = I and I is the identity operator, were constructed in [20, 31, 33],
where I is the identity operator on [mathematical expression not reproducible].
Indeed, the identity operator of the Banach lattice [L.sup.1][0, 1] is almost Dunford-Pettis and fails to be Dunford-Pettis.
[e.sub.1]) [PHI] (t, t) = I (the identity operator on X), for every t [greater than or equal to] 0;