ideogram

(redirected from ideogrammatic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

ideogram

An expression of an idea in a graphic element. From the Greek "idea" + "write." See icon and emoticon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Doing so extends Abram's insight, for we readily see how the animate world infuses not only ideogrammatic systems, but alphabetic systems as well.
Her minimal and joyful transmediations enact the objectivist and self-referential games with reading acts and the ideogrammatic iconization of alphabetic signs that defined Concrete visual poetry.
The nuance is telling, pointing to Pound's Imagist influence and the poet's insistence on "ideogrammatic" simplicity and directness.
Park examines possible traces of Pound's Imagism in Kim's deployment of images, particularly the ways in which Kim's images of war and its aftermaths contrast with Pound's modernist appropriation of ideogrammatic imagery (239-40).
With his persuasive tenor, Chi Liming's impetuous Wine challenges Li Bai to write poetry in exchange for drink, but the two are at odds over what constitutes a well-turned phrase (or, in this case, an original ideogrammatic expression).
Civilisation arose during the 4th millennium BC and revolved initially around a southern Sumerian culture that invented an ideogrammatic (cuneiform) script.
7:226, for an ideogrammatic representation of a service).
Buckminster Fuller that he saw how Pound's ideogrammatic method in The Cantos works (supplemented later by a fascination with Benoit Mandelbrot's fractals).
Sometimes (like Muldoon) breaking down the formal structure into discrete strophes to reinforce the rhetorical structure of the poem, Grennan yet consistently achieves (like Heaney) that ideogrammatic compression idealized by Ezra Pound: the presentation of "an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time." A single sinuous sentence, the final poem of Still Life with Waterfall both articulates and illustrates the efficacy of Grennan's newfound form; observing a robin's bullying of a finch cut short by the lethal attack of a sparrowhawk, Grennan concludes: "and I began to understand / how a poem can happen to you: you have your eye on a small / elusive detail, pursuing its music, when a terrible truth / strikes and your heart cries out, being carried off."