ideogram

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Related to ideograph: ideography

ideogram

An expression of an idea in a graphic element. From the Greek "idea" + "write." See icon and emoticon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using language that recalls the concept of the ideograph so important to Taymor's experimental aesthetic vision, Cartelli and Rowe describe the image of the sunrise as an "artful freeze .
Building upon McGee's work, we suggest that the notion of the ideograph can be applied to a particular social group or cultural niche--in this case, the Roman Catholic Church.
The fact that the concept of the center or the middle is depicted by an ideograph instead of a pictograph indicates to some extent that it is comparatively more abstract than the other four cardinal directions.
This explicitly recalls the BaKongo cosmogram that was a way of stating in ideograph or picture-writing the vitality of the connection of the community of the living to the visions and hopes of the dead.
By contrast Onement x is, in itself, an ideograph of Creation.
This article contributes to the large and growing body of literature on the intervention in Iraq by examining the role the ideograph <human rights> plays in George W.
10) Among those who do "get it," and who exploit this dynamic cultural ideograph to its fullest extent, are political leaders, especially those who harbor spacious and exalted dreams of their own.
Showing participants subliminal images of smiling faces prior to evaluation increased their liking of ideographs (Murphy & Zajonc, 1993; Winkielman, Zajonc, & Schwarz, 1997) and inducing a happy mood caused participants to rate positive events as more likely to occur (Wright & Bower, 1992).
In this way, the filmmaker uses the Chinese culture's most symbolic artifact, its ideographs, as a basis for gentle mockery.
cultures was exacerbated by the use of veiled women as verbal and visual ideographs, which linked women's assumed oppression in these nations as the "white man's burden" (Cloud, p.
Like millions of people across East Asia, 23-year-old Matsumura is forgetting the pictographs and ideographs that have been used in Japan and greater China for centuries.
In fact, as one scholar of Chinese culture observes, "the literal meaning of the ideographs used to represent eunuchs" alludes to silk production.