ideogram

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Related to ideograph: ideography

ideogram

An expression of an idea in a graphic element. From the Greek "idea" + "write." See icon and emoticon.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ideograph [phrase omitted] presents the picture of a traditional Chinese double door, which allows the moon to shine through since there is an interval between the two leaves.
147) Ideographs are "constellation[s] of connotations capable of generating meaningful coherence, especially when tied together with story lines into a policy narrative.
Errors of single-word level were the most frequent error type, which could be divided into five subtypes as unintelligible word, word substitution, ideograph (picture drawing), mirror writing, and visuospatial impairment.
TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" is an ideograph with "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" and "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" two parts; "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" signifies a container.
It makes a difference in our perceptions of the world and our attentions to it whether we are chiseling ideographs on stone tablets or scratching phonetically alphabetized words on papyrus.
Poe's interrelation of literature's capacity to create ecstasy by mixing different psychic contents and conditions in a moment of time appears later in the works of various writers such as Ezra Pound (conceptions of the ideograph and of the Image), James Joyce (the idea of the literary epiphany) or Joseph Frank (the theory of spatial form), qualifying Poe as "America's first aesthetician of simultaneity" (Foust 1981: 19).
As "an ordinary language term found in political discourse," an ideograph is "a high-order abstraction representing collective commitment to a particular but equivocal and ill-defined normative goal" to reconstruct other "comparative 'presents' of the language as they existed in the past" (McGee 12).
What we see in the discursive field, then, is that climate change is an ideograph that is articulated in different, antagonistic ways.
The ideograph, for Taymor, is an abstract essence of an emotion, action, or character that evokes a work's central concept.
The authors analyze the emergence of the <new evangelization> as an ideograph in the Roman Catholic Church at international, national, and local levels--metropolitan Detroit in particular.
For instance, tetrads of elements and building configurations that resemble the ideograph for the number four ([?
I posit that rhetoric may not only invoke traditional or even alternative meanings for an ideograph but may also link ideographs in order to redefine one of them.