idiographic method

idiographic method

a method of investigation which is concerned with the individual or unique experience, rather than with generalities. Thus it is the opposite of a NOMOTHETIC approach. See IDEOGRAPHIC and Fig. 14. Compare ETHNOMETHODOLOGY, MEANINGFUL UNDERSTANDING AND EXPLANATION; see DILTHEY, RICKERT.
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Schuster); (2) Stepping Out: New Directions in Internship Programming (Melissa Barnes); (3) Career as Story: An Introduction to the Haldene Idiographic Method of Career Assessment for Multicultural Populations (Ernest F.
In addition to its idiographic method for distinguishing major and daily life events, the APES allows adolescents to rate the positive or negative impact of each event.
THE USE OF THE IDIOGRAPHIC METHOD IN MANAGEMENT RESEARCH
The use of idiographic methods is recommended for culturally diverse populations, despite the increasing number of cross-cultural validation studies of traditional career-related variables (e.g., interests, values, self-efficacy, decidedness), because idiographic methods are more sensitive to cultural singularities, such as language specificities, cultural identity, acculturation, cultural values, and perceived barriers (Leong & Flores, 2015).
Idiographic methods study the peculiarities of a single subject to make specific observations.
Some of the researches use nomothetic and idiographic methods to explain some problems.
He disguised his Christian beliefs (for which he has rightly been criticized) and he did not thoroughly develop his understanding of those psychological phenomena so they were consistent with his Christian convictions, just as he did not pursue the idiographic methods he espoused.
Although idiographic methods limit generalization compared to nomothetic methods, this type of design has been advocated for applied sport psychology research because of the nature and individualization of program design (Hrycaiko & Martin, 1996).
As Hood and Jonhson wrote, "nomothetic techniques can be more readily interpreted, but they may not be as relevant or as penetrating as idiographic methods" (1991, p.
Hayes et al (1986) and Nelson and Hayes (1979) provide several examples of idiographic methods for evaluating treatment utility when the relationship between assessment and treatment outcomes are predicted a priori.
According to this inflexible philosophical position, a nominalist world-view necessarily leads to an anti-positivist epistemology, a view of humans as free agents that do not respond mechanically to manipulations and, therefore, an absolute requirement for qualitative or idiographic methods. In other words, there can be no mixing of research philosophies and methods to match particular research questions.
(2002) that idiographic methods need to be utilized to a higher degree than previously has been the case.