Idolatry

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Idolatry

Aaron
responsible for the golden calf. [O.T.: Exodus 32]
Ashtaroth
Canaanite deities worshiped profanely by Israelites. [O.T.: Judges 2:12]
Baalim
Canaanite deities worshiped profanely by Israelites. [O.T.: Judges 2:11]
Baphomet
fabled image; allegedly a Templar fetish. [Medieval Legend: Walsh Classical, 46]
golden calf
idol made by Aaron in Moses’s absence. [O.T.: Exodus 32:2–4]
David
King of Israel who was held in reverence after he slew Goliath. [O.T.: Samuel 17:4–51]
Jehu
obliterates the profane worship of Baal. [O.T.: II Kings 10:29]
Jeroboam
forsook worship of God; made golden calves. [O.T.: I Kings 12:28–33]
Moloch
deity to whom parents sacrificed their children. [O.T.: II Kings 23:10]
Parsis
religious community of India; worship fire along with other aspects of nature. [Hindu. Rel.: NCE, 2075]
References in periodicals archive ?
beasts and towns of idolaters, one nevertheless does not find a single
The second passage declares that no idolaters of homosexuals will possess the kingdom of God.
The worst idolater in Northern history thus helped organize the most dramatic battle against idolatry.
The objects of worship, of both ancient and modern idolaters, will find that they will never receive the blessings given by God to true worshippers.
When we first meet the boys--a 15-year-old thug played by Nantsou and his 13-year-old idolater played by Lycos--they're breaking into a car garage to.
Maimonides declares: 'When the Jews are more powerful than the Gentiles we are forbidden to let an idolater among us; even a temporary resident or itinerant trader shall not be allowed to pass through our land.
Although fictitious, these pericopes reveal the attitudes of both the idolater and the opponent towards idols, Close reading uncovers ideas such as human denial of participation in the process and self-creation of the divine statue (Ex.
I assume that it is for that reason that Kant is Leibowitz's favored idolater.
The Deuteronomic History (hereafter DtrH) portrays him as a divisive, rebellious idolater, blamed for the downfall and eventual destruction of the Kingdom of Israel over which he was divinely appointed to rule.
According to them, there was no difference in the halakhic status of wine handled by a Muslim or an idolater.
He notes that Rambam delineates five kinds of heretics (Teshuvah 3:6, 7), one of whom is the idolater who denies the existence of a Creator, and Bleich places all who deny that the entire written and oral Torah derives from Heaven in this category of idolaters and heretics.