idyl


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idyl

(ī`dəl), short poem. The ancient idyls, especially those of Bion and Moschus, were intended as little selections in the style of such longer poems as elegies or epics. There are 10 famous idyls by the Greek TheocritusTheocritus
, fl. c.270 B.C., Hellenistic Greek poet, b. Syracuse. The history of the pastoral begins with him, and in him the form seems to have reached its height. His poetic style is finished and at times artificial, but the bucolic characters in his idyls seem alive.
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, and, since some of them dealt with pastoral or rural scenes, the term idyl came to be restricted to gently flowing, artistic pieces on rural subjects. In the 19th cent., Alfred Tennyson in his Idylls of the King used the term rather in its looser original sense than in the later restricted pastoral meaning. For idyls in their bucolic sense, see pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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idyll

(sometimes US), idyl
1. a poem or prose work describing an idealized rural life, pastoral scenes, etc.
2. any simple narrative or descriptive piece in poetry or prose
3. a piece of music with a calm or pastoral character
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, her Mary Idyl narrates the majority of the novel with a voice "emanating from [an] atypical bod[y] and experience although the narration is also interrupted at key points by an unnamed, presumably able-bodied speaker who admires Mary and wants to persuade her to share her story with the world (Cassuto 230).
This entirely fits with Larcom's dedication of Idyl of Work:
Six months of preparation and experiment were required for An Idyl to come to performance.
This summer is, to quote Tate's early poem "Idyl", "the eucharist of death" ([1926] 1977b: 10): it is the natural world as a profane sacrament.
Gesner's beautiful Idyl of 'The First Navigator', supplied Sestini with the story, in all its details; but he versified it with surprising facility: and, as far as I could judge, with great spirit and elegance.
(20.) John Greenleaf Whittier's Snow-Bound, A Winter Idyl, a poem of more than 750 lines, was first published in book form in Boston in 1866.
After a rather expansive opening movement in [??], the slow movement ("Idyl") opens with a serene and not-so-different melody in [??].
This is an updating--with book replacing the languorous girl's hand mirror--of the narcissistic fireside idyl of The Golden Days from 1944-45 (111).
Sassower's idyl attributes to faculty an extraordinary wisdom that surpasses even that of our founding fathers:
(10.) Klaus Martens, "Versions of the Epic Idyl: A Genre's Intercultural Migrations by Translation," in Proceedings of the Twelfth Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association, ed.
Part 2, |The Mythopoeic Period 1833-89', offers its share of |high' literary samples, notably Helen Hunt Jackson's angry A Century of Dishonor: A Sketch of the United States Government's Dealings with Some of the Indian Tribes (1881), Mark Twain's wonderfully vernacular Roughing It (1899), and a run of pieces complete in themselves like Bret Harte's wry, anti-heroic |The Idyl of Red Gulch' (1870), Stephen Crane's mini-western |The Bride Comes To Yellow Sky' (1898) and Willa Cather's Kansas Civil War story |The Sculptor's Funeral' (from her Collected Stories, 1905).