igneous province

igneous province

[′ig·nē·əs präv·əns]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Late Palaeozoic intrusive and volcanic rocks are widespread north of the Variscan orogen and constitute an early Carboniferous-early Permian igneous province that extends from SW Ireland over Scotland, southern Scandinavia, to the North German Basin and adjacent areas.
The Skye igneous centre forms part of the British Tertiary Igneous Province manifest as a series of voluminous mafic to silicic magmatism in mainland western Scotland and the offshore Hebridean islands associated with the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean (Saunders et al.
Petrology and tectonic significance of Mesozoic mafic dikes of the coastal New England igneous province, Massachusetts.
Leat uses field observations and geochemical relationships to study the Farrar large igneous province basalts of Antarctica, which include voluminous sills and dykes.
The Mackenzie Igneous Event, or Mackenzie Event, is referred to as a Continentaltype Large Igneous Province ("LIP").
Courtillotthinks the cade for volcanism is helped by the North Atlantic Tertiary Igneous Province (NATIP), an enormous plateau of basalts along the coasts of Greenland and Scotland, which may have erupted at the same time as the Deccan Traps.
The Canabrava Project is located on the southwestern margin of the Sao Francisco Craton within the Upper Cretaceous Alto-Paranaiba Igneous Province.
This fault zone marks the boundary between pre-accretion crustal elements and the Caribbean-Colombian Igneous Province made of Upper Cretaceous oceanic plateau fragments (Kerr et al.
5 million years closely matches the age of a large igneous province - made up of rocks formed by magma that has cooled - stretching more than 1,500 kilometers (932 miles) from Alaska to Ellesmere Island in far northeastern Canada.
The North Atlantic Igneous Province is one of the youngest and most accessible of the large igneous provinces that are associated with both the voluminous outpouring of basaltic lavas and the emplacement of giant dyke swarms.
Although large igneous province rocks resemble those created by seafloor spreading, subtle differences suggest that they arise from deeper, hotter regions of the mantle.
The Silicic Large Igneous Province erupted as hundreds of explosions between 50 and 15 million years ago.