ignite

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ignite

[ig′nīt]
(chemistry)
To start a fuel burning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Should upholstered furniture become regulated to the point that such fires cannot be ignited so easily, children, who will continue to play with matches, candles and lighters, will ignite other household items, the study said.
This finding is particularly meaningful to us, as it underscores the need for a close partnership between our creative and media teams," said Lydia Estrada, vice president of media services for Ignited Minds.
Ignited Minds is a fully integrated advertising agency located in Marina del Rey, California, that offers a complete range of services including: advertising, graphic design, online, video, event management, promotions, media and strategic planning.
color) An arson detective Thursday said this garage was filled with newspapers and other combustible material that could have been ignited by space heaters.
Supplying packaging for companies like Ignited allows On the Go to maximize efficiencies of its manufacturing equipment, and can become a significant revenue contributor, while complementing our overall manufacturing capabilities," said Stuart Turk, CEO of On The Go Healthcare.
Ignited Performance Products develops and distributes automotive performance products marketed under the 'Ignited' brand name.
We're enthusiastic about the prospect of helping an exciting new company market in the Wireless Internet environment," said Eric Johnson, President of Ignited Minds, "and to build a brand identity in both online and traditional consumer space.
After consulting with residents, reading weather forecasts and setting up firebreak lines, more than 150 firefighters stood along a two-mile perimeter while a helicopter ignited fires using the jelly-type substance called Alumigel.
the East Lost Hills Bellevue Well #1 blewout and ignited.
in Ojai, was performing a hazard abatement routine when his tractor hit a rock and ignited the fire, officials said.
Some investigators have theorized that vapors lingering in the empty tank from the plane's previous flight from Athens to New York could have been what ignited.
When ignited, the chemical burns at 4,300 degrees - nearly twice the temperature needed to melt ordinary steel.