ignition point


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Related to ignition point: Ignition temperature

ignition point

[ig′nish·ən ‚pȯint]
(chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
After the ignition point, the flame starts propagating from the spark plug into the pre-chamber.
Given that it is clear that they have a broad range of temperatures from the intake of fresh air-fuel mixture (0 - 50 [degrees]C) to the temperature at the ignition point (520 - 600 [degrees]C), thermodynamic properties are not constant.
Locate the pilot flame or electronic ignition point and follow the pilot tube to the burner.
The fuel package approach can be used for any group of furniture, and a group of furniture has different HRRs for different ignition points, and one ignition point would have the maximum HRR.
Propane's high ignition point, 940 degrees Fahrenheit, makes it less of a fire hazard than gasoline, which ignites at 430 to 500 degrees Fahrenheit.
The ignition point of gas is high--1,000 to 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit.
For Gingrich, this in fact, might be the blow that ends his campaign, or for that matter, it may backfire and be the ignition point he needs to overcome his opposition.
Flame arrestors are commonly constructed of fine metallic conductors installed within tubular members that serve to absorb heat from the flame front, lowering the temperature below the ignition point, and then dissipating it harmlessly through the housing to the atmosphere.
Greene and others on the faculty point to the fall 2010 dismissal of key members of the public administration department faculty as one ignition point in the current firestorm.
The higher preheat temperature indicates a smaller temperature barrier between the green reactant and the ignition point. Thus, for the same thermal conductivity properties the flame front propagation velocity will be significantly increased.