iliacus

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iliacus

[i′lī·ə·kəs]
(anatomy)
The portion of the iliopsoas muscle arising from the iliac fossa and sacrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diagnosis and treatment of injury to the peripheral nervous system in general and nerve to iliacus in particular is one of the greatest challenge in orthopedic or neurosurgery because the injury may occur anywhere in complete pathways of neural elements right from entry point of nerve into iliacus muscle to the controlling nerve center in the brain.
We presented a case with staphylococcal pyomyositis of the iliacus muscle and gluteal minimus muscle in a 23-year-old male complicated with septic pulmonary embolism and septic shock.
Therefore, the obtained values for the difference in muscle activation for right and left leg in without implanted case is Rec Femoris [7.75], Glut Medius [8.06], Glut Maximus [8.06], Add magnus [18.28] and Iliacus muscle [1.44].
Techniques such as minimizing the procedural time, avoiding injury to the vessels and maintaining optimal posture of patient's thigh by limiting abduction and external rotation of hip (7) and avoiding trauma to the iliacus muscle during catheterization can all be utilized to prevent the complications.
The sub-caecal position of appendix, in which the appendix is found beneath the caput caeci, was present in 1% of the cases, similar to study done in Bangladish by Paul et al.16 The appendix lies in the iliac fossa and the peritoneal covering of that fossa alone separates the organ from the iliacus muscle. The appendix with its mesentery is twisted in a clockwise direction from left to right, and frequently its tip is directed upwards.
(7) The fascicles are oriented inferolaterally and come together as a common tendon which descends over the pelvic brim and shares a common insertion with the iliacus muscle on the lesser trochanter of the femur.
Under ultrasound guidance, the skin and subcutaneous tissue in the femoral-inguinal area was infiltrated down to the iliacus muscle with 5 to 10 ml 1% lignocaine with adrenaline (1/200,000).
Check the associated graphic for the position of the psoas major muscle and the iliacus muscle. If your assessment procedure causes pain or panic in your client you must stop immediately.
The same is true for the iliacus muscle. In standing, using one side creates a hinge at the hip (if you hold the waist steady) and moves the thigh upward toward your nose, while using both sides hinges the entire trunk forward.
A hematoma involving the iliacus muscle can produce postoperative femoral nerve palsy and has been associated with perforation of the medial wall of the acetabulum during acetabular reaming.