iliotibial tract

(redirected from iliotibial band)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms.

iliotibial tract

[‚il·ē·ō′tib·ē·əl ‚trakt]
(anatomy)
A thickened portion of the fascia lata extending from the lateral condyle of the tibia to the iliac crest.
References in periodicals archive ?
a: label the bony landmarks, b: harvest the iliotibial band tendon, c: graft preparation, d: establish the femoral and tibial tunnels, e: implant the graft, f: reexamine the femoral and tibial tunnels by 3D CT.
First-line therapy for ITBS is conservative, (17-19,36,37) often involving a combination of techniques such as refraining from the activity that triggers the pain, NSAIDs, activity modification to reduce the strain over the ITB, myofascial release via foam rollers, and physical therapy focused on stretching the iliotibial band, tensor fasciae latae, and gluteus medius while strengthening the gluteus medius and core muscles.
The exercises to address iliotibial band tightness include common standing stretches in 3 positions of upright standing, overhead clasped hands and diagonally lowered arms [93].
New literature confirms that the iliotibial band is extremely rigid and resistant to stretch.
Kimberley, 30, thought to be suffering iliotibial band syndrome which afflicts runners, said: "I'm on lots of painkillers when I need them.
However problems may specifically arise where the iliotibial band (on the outside of the thigh) is too tight and flicks over the bone on the outside of the knee.
Ferber et al recently observed greater peak rearfoot inversion moment, greater peak knee internal rotation angle, and greater peak hip adduction angle in a sample of 35 women with iliotibial band syndrome.
Since last fall, she has been hampered by a severely inflamed iliotibial band in her left leg.
I had iliotibial band surgery a few years ago so the doctors said it might be coming from that.
This edition has been updated, expanded, and revised with new sections on the elbow joint and iliotibial band syndrome and a new chapter on sports physiotherapy by an additional author, in addition to updates to the concept of greater trochanter pain syndrome.
Ultrasound is useful in evaluating the following tendons about the hip: iliopsoas, rectus femoris, sartorius, tensor fasciae latae and iliotibial band, common adductor, pectineus, distal rectus abdominis and conjoined tendon, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and common hamstring origin.