illusion

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illusion

1. Psychol a perception that is not true to reality, having been altered subjectively in some way in the mind of the perceiver
2. a very fine gauze or tulle used for trimmings, veils, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

illusion

[ə′lü·zhən]
(psychology)
A false interpretation of a real sensation; a perception that misinterprets the object perceived.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Illusion

Barmecide feast
imaginary feast served t0 beggar by prince. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “The Barmecide’s Feast”]
Emperor’s New Clothes
supposedly invisible to unworthy people; in reality, nonexistent. [Dan. Lit.: Andersen’s Fairy Tales]
Fata Morgana
esp. in the Straits of Messina: named for Morgan le Fay. [Ital. Folklore: Espy, 14]
George and Martha
as an imaginary compensation for their childlessness, pretend they have a son, who would now be twenty-one. [Am. Drama: Edward Albee Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? in On Stage, 447]
Glass Menagerie, The
drama of St. Louis family escaping reality through illusion (1945). [Am. Lit.: The Glass Menagerie, Magill III, 418–420]
Herbert, Niel
Mrs. Forrester’s affairs destroyed his image of her. [Am. Lit.: A Lost Lady]
Hudibras
English Don Quixote; opponent of repressive laws. [Br. Lit.: Hudibras, Espy, 204]
Marshland, Jinny
saw philanderer Brad Criley as true lover. [Am. Lit.: Cass Timberlane]
mirage
something illusory, such as an imaginary tree and pond in the midst of a desert. [Pop. Usage: Misc.]
Mitty, Walter
imagines self in brilliant and heroic roles. [Am. Lit.: “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” in Cartwell, 606–610]
Quixote, Don
attacks windmills thinking them giants. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]
Snoopy
imaginative dog. [Comics: “Peanuts” in Horn, 542–543]
Xanadu
place appearing in Coleridge’s dream; where Kubla Khan “did/A stately pleasure-dome decree.” [Br. Lit.: “Kubla Khan” in Payton, 744]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The representationality of illusionist fiction is due to the application of a principle whose most basic purpose is to offer the recipients some concrete "building blocks" as material for the possible world in which they can recenter themselves in their imagination (a mere argument consisting of abstract notions would not suffice).
It is another major coup for a show that has already surpassed expectations since the seven illusionists were brought together and, in a marketing masterstroke, billed as a comic-book-style Avengers of Magic.
In April in 1983, American illusionist David Copperfield made the Statue of Liberty disappear on live television.
Anumod Sharma, MD of the Kingdom of Dreams and Rajeev Suri of the Franz Harary Productions were present at the show, visibly delighted at having brought the renowned illusionist to India.
The Illusionist is a compelling piece of work that deserves to be seen if just for the gorgeous panoramas of Scotland.
Last believes that quality of light "is reflected in an extraordinary way" in "The Illusionist." The Scottish setting also suits the storyline, based on an unproduced script by legendary French comic filmmaker Jacques Tati.
Extras include director's commentary, Making of The Illusionist and Easter Egg.
Verdict: Based on a short story by Steven Millhauser, The Illusionist is an entertaining thriller, which begs inevitable comparisons with The Prestige.
So the Prince attends one of the illusionist's performances with his entourage in tow, including his beautiful fiancee, Sophie von Teschen (Biel), and wily police Chief Inspector Uhl (Giamatti).
Speaking of romantic partners: Your ex-boyfriend, illusionist David Blaine, regularly risks his life in public.
Despite some "illusionist" pieces, the focus of this biennial was not on effects or information overload.
ILLUSIONIST David Blaine could die when he begins taking nourishment again after his fast ends tonight, an expert who has examined his health has warned.