illusory correlation


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illusory correlation

[i‚lü·zə·rē ‚kä·rə′lā·shən]
(statistics)
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In other words, the relationship between processing intensity and strength of the illusory correlation was said to resemble an inverted-U, because perceiving an illusory correlation depends on a moderate level of processing that is sufficient to allow for the recognition of differential frequencies of social information, but not so thorough as to allow for the highly accurate processing of that information.
and Darley's bystander studies, and stereotype formation: revisiting Hamilton and Gifford's illusory correlation studies.
She listed a number of types of biases to be aware of, such as confirmation bias, illusory correlation, selective attention, overgeneralization, and fading affect bias.
The illusory correlation bias occurs when two economic series appear to have an extremely tight statistical relationship when there is little or no theoretical link between the two variables.
finding appears to be a clear example of a spurious correlation (otherwise known as illusory correlation or the "lurking variable"), a situation in which two otherwise unrelated variables are correlated because each is related to a third unmeasured variable.
Of course, skeptics might still insist that Robins and Post im plicitly exaggerate the statistical connection between paranoid personalities and acts as a result of cognitive biases, such as hypothesis-confirming search strategies, illusory correlation, and the fundamental attribution error.
The term illusory correlation refers to the perception of covariation between two classes of events that are uncorrelated (or less strongly correlated than perceived).
This false attribution of the results of therapy, called the illusory correlation bias, is very resistant to contradictory data from better information sources, such as clinical trials.
Research repeatedly has indicated that people operate under a number of cognitive biases and information processing limitations such as illusory correlation, cognitive overload, and overconfidence.
While what they do might well be valid, how they say it when consciously reconstructing it often takes the form of illusory correlations, errors of cause-effect interpretations, or generalization beyond the bounds of their experience.
The author explains that because of various cognitive biases and illusions, such as hindsight bias, illusory correlations, etc.