imagery


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imagery

1. figurative or descriptive language in a literary work
2. Psychol
a. the materials or general processes of the imagination
b. the characteristic kind of mental images formed by a particular individual

imagery

[′im·ij·rē]
(psychology)
Mental images that are collectively recalled.

imagery

The representation of objects reproduced by optical, IR (infrared), or electronic means on film, electronic display devices, or other media.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the early 1990s a great deal of research on imagery use in sport has been focused around Paivio's (1985) conceptualized model of imagery functions.
Differences in imagery use between sports, competitive levels, and athlete's sex evidence how much variability is present (Kizildag & Tiryaki, 2012).
Although many practical imagery interventions have been shown to improve strength performance, little is known about the mechanisms underlying these improvements.
As it is now well known, common neural substrates underlie motor performance and mental imagery (Guillot et al.
Imagery is considered to be pervasive and elemental in dance training, technique, and performance (4); consequently, the literature is full of references to imagery and its uses.
Any image can be used to inspire artistry, which may be the most prominent use for imagery in dance.
East View Geospatial as an extra offering can offer subscription access to data from the Hexagon Imagery Program through Views: Spatial Data as a Service.
Kent Lee, East View Geospatial founder and CEO said, "East View Geospatial customers now have access to the highest resolution, most current orthorectified imagery over the United States and Western Europe.
A variety of research has investigated the effects of imagery on force production (9,13,14), but few studies have looked at the effect of a functional imagery intervention on complex movements (such as a back squat or power clean) to improved athletic performance.
Imagery questionnaires and performance tests are extensively used to measure image vividness.
Franklin, a dancer, choreographer, teacher, and founder and director of a dance institute in Switzerland, details his method of using mental imagery in dance.
Studies showed that many of the world's highest-level athletes use the imagery routinely with regard to improve the performance with various degrees of success [8].