imaginary

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imaginary

Maths involving or containing imaginary numbers. The imaginary part of a complex number, z, is usually written Imz
References in periodicals archive ?
Faulkner's rhetoric becomes almost alarmingly straightforward and uncomplicated, imaginarily suturing the traumatic gaps and uncanny imbrications explored in the narrative's first section.
By bringing a specifically theatrical conception of presence to bear on his mediated experience of an imaginarily reconstructed 'live' performance, the author attempts what, in effect, amounts to an intermedial critical discourse on presence and absence.
Shamo'on adds that imaginative relaxation acts as the most distinctive feature of the human mind that gives the individual a chance to imaginarily change the unpleasant aspects of stressful situations in compensation for failure to change them in reality.
He imaginarily refuses to grow up, wishing to remain his mother's child forever, and avoiding thus his turning into an incestuous son.
If the mimes, gestures, and body movements in Western theatre are used to inject a sense of realism, actuality, and immediacy into the dramatic scenes of the play, this physical language in Peking opera is employed imaginarily, symbolically, and abstractly.
verba that the tractates, perhaps entirely imaginarily, posit.
The novels, though mainly set in London, either devote a part of the narrative to depict first-generation characters that migrate to Britain from ex-colonial territories--Jamaica in Small Island, Bangladesh in Brick Lane--or show characters forced to imaginarily cross continents in an attempt to trace their roots back and negotiate their present identity status in Britain (such is the case of Irie and Millat in White Teeth).
I shall discuss three Holocaust hybrid texts whose constructors represent both cases: Elie Wiesel's novel, Night (French 1958/English 1960), factually rooted in the author's personal experience, as well as two novels: Cynthia Ozick's The Shawl (1989) and Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything Is Illuminated (2002), imaginarily roundabout artistic representations of the catastrophic event.
The party took place in several inflatable play pools, where party guests were imaginarily transported on decorated floats they built on their rubber flip-flops.
In this way, they imaginarily construct themselves as that-which-they-are-not, which is to say, as a hegemonic subject.
The idea of "Italy" and of "Italians" that circulated from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance among members of the intellectual elite, whose names range from Brunetto Latini and Dante to Boccaccio, Petrarch and Machiavelli, was revisited during the 18th and 19th centuries by Vittorio Alfieri, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni, and Giacomo Leopardi, among others, in order to promote an Italian identity based upon an imaginarily shared linguistic and cultural heritage.