Imbricate Structure

imbricate structure

[′im·brə·kət ‚strək·chər]
(geology)
A sedimentary structure characterized by shingling of pebbles all inclined in the same direction with the upper edge of each leaning downstream or toward the sea. Also known as shingle structure.
Tabular masses that overlap one another and are inclined in the same direction. Also known as schuppen structure; shingle-block structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Imbricate Structure

 

a tectonic structure characterized by relatively thin and elongated rock sheets that overlap one another. The thickness of the rock sheets ranges from a few meters to a few hundred meters. Imbricate structures are usually found in series, forming groups of closely spaced folds, low-angle thrust faults, or fault-folds. In folded regions, they form imbricated fault zones. The amplitude of displacement may reach several kilometers but is usually not greater than a few hundred meters.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the western limb of the synclinorium, normal faults, approximately parallel to the trend of the limb, are superimposed on the imbricate structure of Silurian and Devonian units.
Steeped in such a field, it is hard not to see the imbricate structure of science, culture and politics.