imbricate

(redirected from imbricated)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

imbricate

[′im·brə·kət]
(biology)
Having overlapping edges, such as scales, or the petals of a flower.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

imbricate

To overlap in regular order, as shingling, tiles, etc.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lowrie also considers the relationship between historical and fictive accounts in the novel, noting the imbricated structure of the narrative's characters Valentinois (historical), Tournon (fictional), Boulen (historical), and Themines who is "an admixture of both" (45).
2 and is made up of two imbricated switching cells: ([A.sub.1], [B.sub.1]) and ([A.sub.2], [B.sub.2)].
This revisionary focus leads Davis to see Faulkner's work as imbricated with clear evocations from a number of cultural and theoretical arenas: game theory, legal discourse, property rights, racial power.
Aren't they all 'imbricated'--overlapping to you and me.
(3) There is a deeply imbricated relationship between cinema and colonization: "the beginnings of cinema coincided with the giddy heights of the imperial project, with an epoch where Europe held sway over vast tracts of alien territory and hosts of subjugated peoples" (Shohat and Stam 100).
Paul Mason shares this view, and his article is a thoughtful argument for the value of neuroanthropology--a multidisciplinary field integrating neuroscience and anthropology--as a way to analyse the mind, self, society and culture as deeply imbricated physical and cultural processes.
(2) Such notions, universalized to some degree through international conventions, (3) have been resisted, assimilated, and become imbricated in family relations and child-rearing practices in complex and contradictory ways in societies which have long engaged in globalization.
It is interesting how often racial identity becomes imbricated into this intersection as well, although the editors do very little to parse it.
Mary Wilson Carpenter has a rich subject in her exploration of the ways in which the languages of gender, sexuality, and the Bible are imbricated in nineteenth-century literature.
A single piece of Surgicel was rolled tightly into a cigar shape and imbricated into the site.
At the Third Book's mid-point, Duval argues that the design of the book is centripetal, so that the imbricated episodes are constructed around a "unique center" (Design, TL, 124) borrowed from a proverb in Erasmus' Adagia, "Congnois Toy," or the Socratic "Know thyself." Here Panurge condemns himself as a good hetmeneutist but a moral fool, just like the astrologer he condemns for his vanity but ironically resembles.
Antle's study is significant in that it recognizes the necessity of addressing several imbricated features of what can only be called a surrealist hegemony.