immanent


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immanent

of or relating to the pantheistic conception of God, as being present throughout the universe
References in periodicals archive ?
Music's Immanent Future is a kaleidoscopic collection that reflects on aspects of music studies today, drawing on concepts by Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Jean-Luc Nancy, Julia Kristeva, and Michel Foucault, among others.
(Clockwise): A scene from 'Nervous Translation', 'The Ashes And Ghosts Of Tayug 1931', 'Manila Is Full Of Men Named Boy', 'The Imminent Immanent', and 'Eerie'
Set in a sleepy rural town, as a typhoon gives rise to 'strange events and even stranger behavior,' 'The Imminent Immanent' topbills Sylvia Sanchez, Angeli Bayani, Arjo Atayde and Chai Fonacier.
This, in turn, produces what Taylor calls the nova effect, which is an explosion of options available for finding or creating meaning and significance within the immanent frame.
The incorporation of car collisions into the immanent materialism of traffic jams guides individuals closer to the actuality of ordinary life.
I also identify the limitations of his idea of the other: Levinasian the other could be equated with an angelic being; his idea of the other could negate concrete differences of the other; and his idea of the other could justify negative understanding of the immanent dimensions of the other.
This leads to Roach distinguishing between the notions of 'immanent crisis' and what he calls 'immanent complementarity'--as that which represents 'the possibilities of linking immanent critique with societal order and new forms of subjectivity' (2010, p.
sees it, superposition also nicely describes the relation between the immanent and the economic Trinity: "the economic Trinity is superimposed on the eternal potentiality of the immanent Trinity and emerges in particularity in relationship to the creation" (153).
Edwards's purpose is to provide a survey and brief evaluation of different views as to what properties are (universals--transcendental or immanent, tropes, various forms of nominalism, and pluralism), develop and apply a methodology for approaching this task (identify the features properties are supposed to have and look at the roles they are alleged to play), and defend a pluralist position.
In the following section, we will begin by examining how Deleuze sought to construct an immanent ontology by drawing from the conceptual resources provided by philosophers such as Scotus, Spinoza and Nietzsche.
Russian sociologist Pitirim (1889-1968) is perhaps best known for his premise that sociocultural change was an immanent part of societies instead of something being brought about by external conditions.