immanent

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immanent

of or relating to the pantheistic conception of God, as being present throughout the universe
References in periodicals archive ?
That energy, which was not internally available to conscious awareness, is now immanently available in its external projected form.
Ely favors a narrow proceduralist interpretation of due process protection while Tribe argues that a position such as Ely's is immanently contradictory--a defense of procedure at root presupposes a belief in a substantive right to procedure.
As we shall immanently see, the concern with part-whole relations is also present in some of the most important Melanesian materials: cloth and basket weaving.
Mental states would therefore exist but would not be immanently related to the self: "Emerson's representation of the transcience of moods further erodes the commonplace idea that mental states are personal and that we govern what occurs 'within'" (I 88).
The monologues of the women members of the Tribe make for a particularly moving read, immanently transformed as they are by their own utterance, by their narratives of "exile" revolt, and sanction.
49) Being a "peculiarity of English institutions," the full meaning of the rule of law could only be discerned immanently, by tracing "its influence throughout some of the main provisions"of the English constitution.
But neither does form an indivisible unity with it, immanently restaging the world's processes, as Lee proposes.
The deeper dimension of Coleman's metamorphosis cannot be a mimetic repetition of the tragedy of the House of Atreus; for the motive for a change of identity is desire as the impelling force moving the subject towards that which is other than itself--that which, in the words of the poet Thomsen, "is not immanently contained in one's own form" (Thomsen 1985: 64).
On the other hand, they are concerned with the unique, immanently defined content of the real event.
The critique is in many ways familiar and many of the proposed policy changes seem immanently reasonable, but the argument is too clinical.
The research of human sciences must place itself into this kind of wholes and describe them immanently.
Something is bound to go terribly wrong when so many Christians see the planet as an unimportant holding place where we await salvation; or when preachers and teachers of the faith place too much emphasis on humanity's privileged status without also explaining our responsibilities to tend the garden; or when Christians see God as transcendent but not immanently present in creation.