immune protein


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immune protein

[i′myün ′prō‚tēn]
(immunology)
Any antibody.
References in periodicals archive ?
His team had previously found that a lower frequency of certain variations that appear to cause increased production of interferon gamma (an immune protein that incites inflammation in MS) in men may protect them from developing MS.
"When the stem-loop is in place and stable, it blocks a host cell immune protein that otherwise would bind to the virus and stop the infectious process," said senior author Michael Diamond, MD, PhD, professor of medicine.
Eculizumab works for patients as it prevents kidney damage by blocking an immune protein called "complement".
Other results in the study suggested that elevated levels of IL-4, another immune protein, could be found in animals with lower infection levels.
Medications such as Lenercept that inhibit this immune protein may also block myelin repair.
Results from clinical trials including patients in the North East have shown that the drug eculizumab is the best first-line of treatment for patients as it prevents kidney damage by blocking an immune protein called 'complement'.
"We found that changing a single letter of the virus's genetic code can disable the stem-loop's protective effects and allow the virus to be recognized by the host immune protein. We hope to find ways to weaken the stem-loop structure with drugs or other treatments, restoring the natural virus-fighting capabilities of the cell and stopping or slowing some viral infections," he added.
A study finds that the test, which checks urine levels of an immune protein, might lessen the need for kidney biopsies in some patients and pinpoint others who might safely reduce their dose of immune-suppressing drugs.
Washington, May 21 ( ANI ): An immune protein that has the potential to stop or reverse the development of type 1 diabetes in its early stages, before insulin-producing cells have been destroyed, has been identified by Melbourne researchers.
There are many players in this over reaction, including an immune protein called TLR4, or toll-like receptor 4, and enzymes called proteinases in allergens.
They focused on toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an immune protein that is involved in recognizing microbes and which they recently discovered plays a role in gut development.