impact energy


Also found in: Medical.

impact energy

[′im‚pakt ‚en·ər·jē]
(mechanics)
The energy necessary to fracture a material. Also known as impact strength.

impact strength, impact energy

The amount of energy required to fracture a material; a measure of the material’s resistance to mechanical shock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the steels from mill B have the highest values of impact energy (Figure 3).
The impact energy and striking force during the striking action of the hydraulic breaker are given in Table 3.
[8] on Cr-martensitic steels were carried out to find the effect of delta ferrite and dendritic carbides precipitated on the delta ferrite boundaries which caused the drop in impact energy. Wang et al.
Powered by a combination of oil and gas, the HB 10000 is also virtually independent from the carriers hydraulic oil supply, resulting in 70% of the impact energy being regenerated by the gas in the piston accumulator and only 30% coming from by the hydraulic oil supply of the carrier.
First, concerning the EO, it has been observed that this contaminant decreases the Young modulus, the volume strain and the impact energy and the yield stress for the unfilled material and the impact energy for the talc-filled one.
Digital displays tell the user exactly what the current settings are, including test drop height, velocity, and impact energy (Instron, 2006).
It is designed to dissipate impact energy in a controlled way.
It absorbs maximum impact energy comparable to PC/ABS, Solvay says.
Variations in the signal amplitude correlated with the impact energy for a given type of impact material.
Internal shock pads are standard to absorb impact energy and eliminate metal-to-metal contact.
When the preset limits are exceeded, the device absorbs the impact energy through a pneumatic chamber and redirects the energy to reset itself.
Legislation is going to demand that the front of a car must absorb up to 700 Joules of impact energy on the front edge of the bonnet.