impact velocity

impact velocity

[′im‚pakt və′läs·əd·ē]
(mechanics)
The velocity of a projectile or missile at the instant of impact. Also known as striking velocity.
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Just last year I used a 162-grain InterLock at very close range on an Alabama whitetail buck, and despite an impact velocity of well over 3,000 fps, the bullet exited after dropping him where he stood.
IV) = impact velocity, (PEN) = total penetration (penetration was only measured inside the gel block and does not include the pork ribs or clothing), (EXP) = average diameter of expanded bullet, (RW) = weight of recovered bullet.
They make aiming much easier, cut down on bullet flight time (this offers a variety of benefits with skittish animals or windy conditions), and arrive at the target animal at a much more sedate pace than they left the muzzle--so we must still use impact velocity to determine their killing potential rather than muzzle velocity.
A transition regime exists between the spreading and splashing, which they observed by changing either the impact velocity or the ambient pressure while the other is fixed.
Considering the dishing values calculated using the new analytical model; it can be observed that for a specified projectile and target, the ratio of the dishing amount to the target thickness decreases by increasing the initial impact velocity.
The analytical response of the composite plate was calculated taking in account 5x5 modal parameters, for different cases of impact velocity.
That's a lofty claim, but the older M56 amino required a specific impact velocity in order for its high explosive incendiary properties to function correctly.
There are few reports found in open literature dealing with finite element analysis of multiaxial impact behavior of polymers as a function of impact velocity and temperature.
The lower impact velocity calibers and loads, like the .
The single most important factor in the performance of a bullet is its impact velocity.
So you have to design a machine that will accelerate the component and provide the required impact velocity.
The main disadvantages of the direct drive wheels are: * abrasive impact velocity is "fixed" and cannot be changed without changing the wheel diameter, changing to curved vanes or running the motor from an expensive variable frequency drive; * motor bearings are not nearly as rugged as standard spindle bearings and, consequently, bearing failure can be a problem.