impeachment

(redirected from impeach)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

impeachment,

in Great Britain and United States, formal accusation issued by a legislature against a public official charged with crime or other serious misconduct. In a looser sense the term is sometimes applied also to the trial by the legislature that may follow. In other countries, impeachment may refer to the removal of a public official from office instead of the accusation. Impeachment developed in England, beginning in the 14th cent., as a means of trying officials suspected of dereliction of duty. The English procedure was for the House of Commons to prosecute by presenting articles of impeachment to the House of Lords, which rendered judgment. Any penalty, including death, might be inflicted. The impeachment (1787) and trial (1788–95) of Warren HastingsHastings, Warren,
1732–1818, first governor-general of British India. Employed (1750) as a clerk by the East India Company, he soon became manager of a trading post in Bengal.
..... Click the link for more information.
 was among the last of the English cases.

In the United States impeachment of public officials is provided for in the federal government and in most states. In federal matters the U.S. Constitution gives the House of Representatives the power to impeach civil officers of the United States, including the President and Vice President, but not including members of Congress. Impeachments are tried by the Senate, with the concurrence of two thirds of the members present needed for conviction. The sole penalties on conviction are removal from office and disqualification from holding other federal office; however, the convicted party is liable to subsequent criminal trial and punishment for the same offense.

There have been 20 impeachments tried by the Senate and eight convictions. Three of the best-known cases, which did not result in conviction, were those of Supreme Court Justice Samuel ChaseChase, Samuel,
1741–1811, political leader in the American Revolution, signer of the Declaration of Independence, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1796–1811), b. Somerset co., Md.
..... Click the link for more information.
, President Andrew JohnsonJohnson, Andrew,
1808–75, 17th President of the United States (1865–69), b. Raleigh, N.C. Early Life

His father died when Johnson was 3, and at 14 he was apprenticed to a tailor.
..... Click the link for more information.
, and President Bill Clinton (see Lewinsky scandalLewinsky scandal
, sensation that enveloped the presidency of Bill Clinton in 1998–99, leading to his impeachment by the U.S. House of Representatives and acquittal by the Senate.
..... Click the link for more information.
). In 2019, President Donald Trump was impeached on charges relating to the withholding of aid to Ukraine when he and his advisers were seeking a Ukrainian investigation into supposedly corrupt actions by Joseph Biden and his son. The Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives voted in 1974 to bring impeachment charges against President Richard Nixon (see Watergate affairWatergate affair,
in U.S. history, series of scandals involving the administration of President Richard M. Nixon; more specifically, the burglarizing of the Democratic party national headquarters in the Watergate apartment complex in Washington, D.C.
..... Click the link for more information.
), but Nixon resigned before the House took action.

Bibliography

See studies by I. Brant (1972), R. Berger (1973), C. L. Black, Jr. (1974), J. R. Labovitz (1978), R. A. Posner (1999), and C. R. Sunstein (2018).

References in classic literature ?
Sir Pitt Crawley (named after the great Commoner) was the son of Walpole Crawley, first Baronet, of the Tape and Sealing-Wax Office in the reign of George II., when he was impeached for peculation, as were a great number of other honest gentlemen of those days; and Walpole Crawley was, as need scarcely be said, son of John Churchill Crawley, named after the celebrated military commander of the reign of Queen Anne.
A deeply rooted dread of the man; the conviction that his ferocious nature, once roused, would stop at nothing; and the strong assurance that if she impeached him, the full measure of his wrath and vengeance would be wreaked on Joe, who had preserved her; these were considerations she had not the courage to overcome, and inducements to secrecy too powerful for her to surmount.
According to a Sunday Nation investigation, more than a half of the county governments are in turmoil as a result of the wrangles which have seen over a dozen Executive members impeached. Speakers have also not been spared from the onslaught of MCAs, with one of them telling the Sunday Nation that he hides the mace, the symbol of power in the County Assembly, in a secret place, so as to frustrate efforts to impeach him.
Instead, I am strengthening my commitment to Need to Impeach in 2019 until the House starts impeachment proceedings or Mr.
Their increasingly heated internal debate is whether to impeach Trump now or press for his incarceration after they defeat him next year.
The House voted to impeach Clinton in December 1998, and the Senate acquitted him in February 1999.
22 out of 29 Senators voted on Friday, 29 March to impeach Justice Ja'neh for granting a writ of prohibition filed by two oil and gas companies that prevented government from collecting taxes imposed on pump prices because the taxes had not been legislated.
DONALD Trump has pushed back against some Democrats' calls to impeach him, saying they are only seeking impeachment because they know they cannot win the White House in 2020.
WASHINGTON, Jan 4 (KUNA) -- US President Donald Trump on Friday fired back at Democrats calling for his impeachment, saying that their calls emerge from his "too much success" and their inability to "win in 2020." In twin tweets Trump said that the Democrats "only want to impeach me because they know they can't win in 2020, too much success!" "How do you impeach a president who has won perhaps the greatest election of all time," he said.
Duterte narrated before businessmen how strong-willed his daughter is, to a point that the re-electionist mayor led the ouster of Alvarez after he insinuated last year that he could impeach the President.
"Impeach" is a word that has apparently been on some lips (and in some dreams) over the past year or so.