imperative language

imperative language

[im′per·əd·iv ‚laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A programming language in which programs largely consist of a series of commands to assign values to objects.

imperative language

(language)
Any programming language that specifies explicit manipulation of the state of the computer system, not to be confused with a procedural language, which specifies an explicit sequence of steps to perform.

An example of an imperative (but non-procedural) language is a data manipulation language for a relational database management system. This specifies changes to the database but does not necessarily require anyone to specify a sequence of steps.

Both contrast with declarative languages, which specify neither explicit state manipulation nor a sequence of steps.

procedural language

A programming language that requires programming discipline, such as C/C++, Java, COBOL, FORTRAN, Perl and JavaScript. Also called an "imperative language," programmers writing in such languages must develop a proper order of actions in order to solve the problem, based on a knowledge of data processing and programming. For a procedural vs. non-procedural language example, see non-procedural language.
References in periodicals archive ?
This second part of the book has weak points, most notably in a sometimes-jarring imperative language (there are pleas to "let us consider" and "let us turn").
Jurisdiction means the flexible area within which a rule of law applies and has authority to speak ("jurisdiction"); laws speak in an imperative language which, in a post-structuralist view, is always unruly.
Where the earlier version used a more passive sentence structure, the revision employs imperative language, inciting the very foundations of the earth to bring praises to God.
The last Article 12 of LAAE Aquila Statement, which is introduced with the very strong and imperative language Aowe condemn in the strongest termsAo, refers to the recent nuclear tests as well as the ballistic launch in the Democratic PeopleAAEs Republic of Korea (DPRK).
"I'm entering time taking the time of the terrain entering the tempest of the broken temblor in its strip of sundowns and I enter torpid turf of pasture stubborn stair with its child's opening that accelerates feet" the first sentence of "(entrance)" encapsulates the chemistry of Lip Wolf; Sol&243;rzano's is an insular sound-driven poetry full of deeply embedded and arresting images and imperative language which bewilders and rewards in the same breath.
In this section we describe agent programming languages which are declarative while at the same time providing some specific constructs allowing for the use of code implemented in some external imperative language. These constructs serve as a means for the use of legacy code.
In Section 2, we present declarative agent-oriented languages, while Section 3 covers the imperative languages and Section 4 some hybrid languages.
As a first test of the analogy, we might translate a basic imperative language, such as the language of while programs, into a linear functional language.
To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach we went through the full process of the implementation of the language and the description of its semantics for a specific base imperative language, namely a subset of Modula-2.
Most software developers use an imperative language, in which the order of source statements determines the execution order of compiled object instructions.
"I'm entering time, taking the time of the terrain, entering the tempest of the broken temblor in its strip of sundowns and I enter, torpid turf of pasture, stubborn stair with its child's opening that accelerates feet," the first sentence of "(entrance)" encapsulates the chemistry of Lip Wolf; Solorzano's is an insular sound-driven poetry full of deeply embedded and arresting images and imperative language which bewilders and rewards in the same breath.
We believe, as did McGraw in 1984, that increased productivity, generality, utility, protability, and performance are only possible if programmers avoid the constraints of imperative languages and adopt a higher level of abstraction.