imperfect

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imperfect:

see tensetense
[O.Fr., from Lat.,=time], in the grammar of many languages, a category of time distinctions expressed by any conjugated form of a verb. In Latin inflection the tense of a verb is indicated by a suffix that also indicates the verb's voice, mood, person, and number.
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imperfect

1. Botany
a. (of flowers) lacking functional stamens or pistils
b. (of fungi) not undergoing sexual reproduction
2. Law (of a trust, an obligation, etc.) lacking some necessary formality to make effective or binding; incomplete; legally unenforceable
3. Music
a. (of a cadence) proceeding to the dominant from the tonic, subdominant, or any chord other than the dominant
b. of or relating to all intervals other than the fourth, fifth, and octave
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These papers, while they don't necessarily call upon us to seek imperfection, remind us that it is where we always are: the imperfect tense, the ongoing, the incomplete.
Macedonian and Bulgarian also have syncretic forms in the 2nd and 3rd person singular of the aorist and imperfect tenses and show a similar incidence pattern for overt and null thematic subjects.
After they have read the first four pages of text, I test the individual students over their knowledge of the vocabulary and their ability to put verbs from the novella into the imperfect tense. Groups whose members all score 80% or above on the first test are given a bonus of 5 points for each member.
The terms 'imperfect tense' and 'perfect tense' have been (and still are) inappropriately used in the Bantu languages as labels to refer to the present and past tenses respectively.
In the first three, the common emphasis is on the ongoing process, and they are all three expressed by the "imperfect tense," [4] also called "aorist" (borrowing from Greek grammar) by Bauer and Leander.
In sonnet 130, addressed to Dorat, the first poem devoted to Du Bellay's return to France from Rome, Du Bellay plays with an earlier piece, the famous sonnet 31, using the imperfect tense to describe his former naive jealousy of Odysseus/Ulysses who had been able to return home to see his smoking chimney:
The verb that follows, "saying," is in the imperfect tense, indicating a repeated, habitual action -- Jesus customarily or regularly said this.
The innovations are in the imperfect tense itself, with the addition of verbal prefixes that signal the sub-aspects, like Moroccan ka-ykteb or Egyptian bi-yiktib, 'he writes'.