impinger


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impinger

[im′pin·jər]
(engineering)
A device used to sample dust in the air that draws in a measured volume of dusty air and directs it through a jet to impact on a wetted glass plate; the dust particles adhering to the plate are counted.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Water vapor emitted from the panel was collected in the impingers and volume of water emitted was determined by subtracting the amount of water that was originally in the impingers.
In the second sampler, using an impinger for bubbling, the oxidation of MTS was measured by liquid chromatography with detection at 224 nm [10].
We have not located any health-based generic PM limits using real-time count concentration values (certain workplace mineral dust standards require collection with an impinger, followed by microscopic counts).
Ten impinger sampling stations equipped as before were deployed along Van Eegan Road (Figure 1) on December 8 and 9 at 0.25 mile (402.3 m) intervals for the first mile (1,609.3 m) of the sampling array, followed by 0.5 mile (804.6 m) intervals for the remaining 4.5 mile (7,242 m) sampling line.
After sampling was completed, all the impinger bottles and connecting tubes were rinsed with isopropanol solvent and the sample was collected in a single flask and heated to 83[degrees]C for about 45 minutes till all the isopropylene solvent was evaporated.
The tar content in the producer gases was measured using six impinger bottles, five of which were filled with a solvent (isopropanol) and one which was empty, as in [7, 9, 10].
In Oregon, the condensed hydrocarbons found in the impinger train may also be analyzed.
Method 202, also referred to as the dry impinger method, condenses materials that may have passed through the filter in ice cooled impingers.
A brief note on these two exposure assessment methods: Before the 1970s, airborne asbestos levels were usually measured with the midget impinger method by trapping total airborne (including nonfibrous) dust particles and counting via light microscope (Gibbs 1994).
Setting up of the method was achieved with pure suspensions of Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium brevicompactum conidia at different concentrations, and then analyses were extended to field samples collected by an impinger device.
Impinger and slit samplers are the most commonly used samplers for collecting aerosol viruses (Agranovski et al., 2005; Booth et al., 2005; Hermann et al., 2006; Tseng & Li, 2005).
In 1922 and 1937, the impinger and the midget impinger were introduced, respectively, in the United States, expressing particle concentrations of millions of particles per cubic foot.