implant

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implant

Med anything implanted, esp surgically, such as a tissue graft or hormone

implant

[′im‚plant]
(medicine)
A quantity of radioactive material in a suitable container, intended to be embedded in a tissue or tumor for therapeutic purposes.
A tissue graft placed in depth in the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although work on the system is still in its preliminary stages, Langer envisions that the ultrasound-sensitive drug-containing polymer would be implanted under the skin as a series of microcapsules, each perhaps a few microns in size.
(7) MRI-compatibility of implanted devices can be checked at http://www.MRIsafety.com.
(8) While the EU standards of approval for breast implants or other implanted devices do not require clinical trials or inspections the way the FDA's do, the US standards for many other implanted medical devices are much lower than they are for breast implants, with no clinical trials prior to approval and fewer post-market safeguards than in Europe.
"In women, artificial hips may he implanted at slightly different angles, which may increase friction and wear on the joint" he notes.
"All patients with these bearings should be carefully monitored, particularly young women implanted with large diameter heads."
The Health Ministry's next step is to meet up with the surgeons next week as it is 'unacceptable to have to chase the facts to see what was implanted and in whom.'
In the first, a Swedish- (SSM-N) or a South African-manufactured (SSM-S) implant was implanted into the tibiae of 12 rabbits and the TRF measured at 1, 3 and 6 months.
The surgically implanted device consists of an external transmitter (worn behind the ear like a hearing aid) and an internal device just under the skin.
Researchers from the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research now report that weapons-grade tungsten alloy produces aggressive metastatic tumors when surgically implanted into the muscles of rats [EHP 113:729-734].
Nitric oxide-releasing polymers may work fine for short-term applications, says Meyerhoff, but for such jobs as glucose sensing for diabetes control, "you may want the sensor implanted for a year," he says.