implant

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implant

Med anything implanted, esp surgically, such as a tissue graft or hormone

implant

[′im‚plant]
(medicine)
A quantity of radioactive material in a suitable container, intended to be embedded in a tissue or tumor for therapeutic purposes.
A tissue graft placed in depth in the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fox, a developmental psychologist at the University of Maryland at College Park, and his colleagues tested the McGurk effect in 35 children with normal hearing and 36 who were born deaf but had received cochlear implants.
And, indeed, she woke up in the recovery room with a tissue expander in place of the missing breast, the first step in the two-step reconstruction procedure using a breast implant.
In a telephone interview, with an operator typing questions and reading Corey's typed responses, she said implants are not for everyone, but the operation helped her.
Today's implants for knees, hips and shoulders are constructed of a combination of castings, forgings and/or plastics.
With insufficient data on safety and effectiveness, FDA determined that breast implants could not be approved, and therefore gel-filled implants were removed from the market.
I received hundreds of calls from women across the nation who were ready to consign themselves literally to insane asylums," they were so upset when they heard that breast implants might be linked to serious health problems, she said.
In the heady days of the Gingrich "revolution," with Republican realignment one critical presidential election away, breast implants may seem both silly and dull - a subject of interest only to bimbos and nerds.
However, for some devices, such as the implants in question, and for procedures in general, there are no rigorous requirements for demonstration of safety and effectiveness.
Recipients Accept Award at Event Celebrating 25 years of Nucleus Cochlear Implant Technology
Research presented to the panel suggested that silicone implants break no more frequently and cause no more problems than saline-filled implants, the only alternative now available in the United States.
Infection is often the final blow for medical implants.
The incidence of electrode slippage in cochlear implants was described by Webb et al in their review of implant complications worldwide.