implicit religion

implicit religion

‘aspects of ordinary life which seem to contain an inherently religious element… whether or not they are expressed in ways that are traditionally described as “religious”’ (Implicit Religion - the Journal of the Centre for the Study of Implicit Religion in Contemporary Society). The concept is a relatively novel, and perhaps a questionable, one, but is intended to extend the understanding of human behaviour by deploying insights from the academic study of religion to the wider study of society see also CIVIL RELIGION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The employment of concepts such as "myth", "ritual" or "implicit religion" may need some contextual clarification.
Bailey, the author who coined the concept of "implicit religion" to be applied below onto the case study, was interested precisely in this type of ritualised behaviour.
This article examines recent developments in the study of implicit religion and applies these insights to the secularization thesis in sociology.
Such an argument is made, among others, by Edward Bailey who in England began writing about "implicit religion" in the 1970s and founded the Centre for the Study of Implicit Religion and Contemporary Spirituality in 1995--the publisher since 1998 of the journal Implicit Religion.
Campbell and Grieve divide the volume into three equal sections, each consisting of four chapters: explorations of religiously themed games, religion in mainstream games, and gaming as implicit religion.
This phenomenon can be seen in the context of so-called implicit religion (Bailey 1983, 1990).
'Implicit Religion' is very much the brain-child of one man: the Rev'd Edward Bailey, a former Bristol vicar and now assistant chaplain at St John's College, Oxford.
The research, presented at the annual conference of the Network for the Study of Implicit Religion, was carried out by the University of Wales, Bangor.
New willingness to see the presumably "secular" as loaded with the "religious" and the increasing use of terms such as "secular religions," "moral religion," and "implicit religion," have helped to collapse the dichotomies even further.
There is evidence, therefore, that "'religion' may exist outside the forms of the churches." (103) As Lyden has put it, "there is no absolute distinction between religion and other aspects of culture." (104) This, in turn, demonstrates how apt Bailey's (105) concept of "implicit religion" is: although contemporary Western societies are increasingly secular(ised), many of their members are largely unaware of the extent to which their centuries-old religious legacy permeates their everyday life.
"Editorial: The Quest for Spirituality in the Secular Multi-faith Context of India." Implicit Religion. (July 2005): 101-117.
Critics have discussed concepts such as civil religion or folk religion, residual religion (16) and so on but the most comprehensive and the most connected to our analysis on the manner in which contemporary popular culture (17) (and cinema in particular) recycles, integrates and reinterprets religious patterns, symbols and behaviours is that of implicit religion, coined by Edward I.