implies

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implies

(logic)
(=> or a thin right arrow) A binary Boolean function and logical connective. A => B is true unless A is true and B is false. The truth table is

A B | A => B ----+------- F F | T F T | T T F | F T T | T

It is surprising at first that A => B is always true if A is false, but if X => Y then we would expect that (X & Z) => Y for any Z.
References in periodicals archive ?
Terms will be implied by your conduct in that scenario and the law will imply the obligations of the cafe that you are getting real coffee, and that it is safe and fit to drink.
Indeed, the "implied author" is an ingenious term pointing at once to the producer of the text ("author") and the text itself ("implied"--"his different works will imply different versions [of the author]" (Booth, Rhetoric 71)).
But when we control perspective, we make our pictures imply depth, as well, creating the illusion of a third dimension and building more vitality and meaning.
Age becomes a critical element in discussing adolescence because, to put puberty much later in earlier historical periods seems to imply that we now face unique sexual problems about adolescence.
A recent decision of the court of appeal in R Griggs Group Ltd v Evans explored the extent to which a court may imply an assignment or licence in copyright disputes involving commissioned works.
But their training, terminology, diagnostic framework, and billing practices imply that all these are medical problems appropriately handled by physicians.
United Biscuits, makers of McVitie's, said they "had not intended to imply the low fat content of the products meant they were healthy".
Not that I want to imply that Winters leaves us with the organic, as opposed to the political or collective.
Association with an athlete and an athlete's accoutrements can imply, then, strength or potency.
Bishops and priests should gently imply the same in sermons and parish bulletins and marriage classes, implying that fewer is unfortunate, misguided, or selfish.
By covering the sexual organs as if they were the eyes of criminals, the censors nonetheless imply that these organs have an array of capacities associated with sight, that they offer an alternative way of "seeing" the world.
Children are by far the most likely to harbor ocular chlamydia, and mathematical models imply that they will be the most difficult group to clear from infection (13,14).