impulsive

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impulsive

1. (of physical forces) acting for a short time; not continuous
2. (of a sound) brief, loud, and having a wide frequency range
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Guerrero, Ph.D., from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada, and colleagues examined individual and concurrent associations between meeting the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (nine to 11 hours of sleep, no more than two hours of recreational screen time, and 60 minutes or more of physical activity) and dimensions of impulsivity among 4,524 children aged 8 to 11 years.
Later in life, impulsivity may also make kids vulnerable to other problems, like substance abuse and other forms of addiction, said lead researcher Michelle Guerrero.
However, their emotional reactions to everyday (non-drug-related) motivationally relevant stimuli, and the role that impulsivity plays in those reactions, remains largely unknown.
In addition to different consumption phenotypes, FAAH C385A has been previously associated with impulsivity (Hariri et al, 2009).
Impulsivity is a widely used term in many fields of behavioral science, such as personality psychology, behavioral ecology, psychiatry, behavior analysis, cognitive neuroscience, behavioral economics, learning theory, and psychopharmacology (Green & Myerson, 2013).
There have been various researches, conducted worldwide on the possible risk factors for suicidal ideation and that have revealed that adolescents' vulnerability to suicidal tendencies typically lie in factors as depression, anxiety, helplessness, anger, aggression and impulsivity (Fennig et al., 2005; Park et al, 2006).
The impulsivity of then finance minister Ishaq Dar clashed with wisdom on July 5, 2017 the day the SBP let the rupee fall to 108.24 a dollar from 104.90 a day before.
Impulsivity has been assessed with various measures including self-report scales (e.g.
Studies made on the phenomenon of impulsivity reports that important socio-cultural factors are: materialistic value, self-identity and self-image, power distance behaviour, social interaction, normative social influences and presence of shopping companions.
One of the most common clinical characteristics accompanying with NSSI is impulsivity, and there exists limited studies examining the relationship between impulsivity and NSSI in the category of anxiety disorders, in comparison to other mental disorders (8-12).
The scores on the ImpSS range anywhere from zero indicating low impulsivity to 19 indicating high impulsivity.