common

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Related to in common: Tenants in common

common

1. Maths
a. having a specified relationship with a group of numbers or quantities
b. (of a tangent) tangential to two or more circles
2. Anatomy
a. having branches
b. serving more than one function
3. Christianity of or relating to the common of the Mass or divine office
4. a tract of open public land, esp one now used as a recreation area
5. Law the right to go onto someone else's property and remove natural products, as by pasturing cattle or fishing (esp in the phrase right of common)
6. Christianity
a. a form of the proper of the Mass used on festivals that have no special proper of their own
b. the ordinary of the Mass

Common

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Mercury is a neutral planet in the sense that it is neither feminine nor masculine, neither malefic nor benefic, etc. As a planet that tends to take on the traits of its sign and house placement more readily than other planets, the astrological tradition has characterized Mercury as a common (meaning, in this case, neutral) planet. “Common signs” is another designation for mutable signs (Gemini, Virgo, Sagittarius, and Pisces), which represent a kind of halfway point between the two extremes of cardinal and fixed signs and are thus common (again in the sense of neutral).

common

A large plot of grassy, fenced-in, publicly owned land, generally at or near the center of a village or town; in earlier eras, once shared by the townspeople as a pasture.
References in classic literature ?
This, indeed, might have been expected; for as natural selection acts through one form having some advantage over other forms in the struggle for existence, it will chiefly act on those which already have some advantage; and the largeness of any group shows that its species have inherited from a common ancestor some advantage in common.
I cannot talk to you, sir,' replied Lord George in a loud voice, and waving his hand in a disturbed and agitated manner; 'we have nothing in common.
Even when a treatise on medicine or natural science is brought out in verse, the name of poet is by custom given to the author; and yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common but the metre, so that it would be right to call the one poet, the other physicist rather than poet.