in-place upgrade

in-place upgrade

The installation of an operating system or application on the computer without removing the older version first and without saving any data beyond normal precautions. In-place installations of operating systems have a tendency to cause problems, especially if the new version is very different from the previous one. For example, in-place upgrades are recommended when migrating from Windows Vista to Windows 7, but not from Windows XP. In that case, a "clean install" is recommended, whereby all user data have to be saved externally and restored after the installation, and all applications have to be re-installed. Contrast with clean install.
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Best practices for performing an in-place upgrade to Windows[R] 10 Creators Update RS2 with BestCrypt Volume Encryption can be found here:
Using the official media creation tool, it's possible to perform a clean reformat and in-place upgrade.
This in-place upgrade tool offers a simplified means to take advantage of the latest OpenStack advancements, while preventing downtime for production environments.
After a year of fine-tuning, the in-place upgrade for Windows 10 now works most of the time, but experience suggests that some fine-tuning is generally needed after the event.
In the case of Exchange 2007, he said, "technically the work required to provide this capability is consistent with the work we would need to do to support an in-place upgrade of Exchange itself.
Whether consumers will upgrade their PCs rather than buy new ones is another matter, especially since upgrading from XP requires a reinstallation rather than an in-place upgrade.
1) An in-place upgrade of an existing cluster consisting of 300 12-core Westmere nodes, in a room with evaporative cooling.
lt;p>Because Windows 7E could only be offered in a so-called "full" version that required a clean install -- an in-place upgrade would have left IE on users' PCs -- Microsoft had planned to sell only those full, or non-upgrade, editions in Europe, but at the upgrade versions' prices.
That's because Vista allows an in-place upgrade from XP (something Windows 7 doesn't support), and Windows 7 offers the same for Vista users.