inanition


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inanition

exhaustion resulting from lack of food

inanition

[‚in·ə′nish·ən]
(medicine)
The exhausted, pathologic condition resulting from starvation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years, ECT has assumed an increasingly important role in the treatment of severe and medication-resistant depression and mania as well as in the treatment of schizophrenic patients with affective disorders, delusional symptoms, vegetative dysregulation, inanition, catatonic symptoms and suicidal drive.
Religious fanaticism made the Crusaders continue the siege on the city of Antioch although they did not get the necessary logistics and a significant part of the expedition members died of inanition. The problem, however, arises after the conquest of the fortress, in order to observe the manifestation of a ferocious religious fanaticism, aspect revealed by the fact that they massacred all the Muslims, and besides them the Orthodox Christians, guilty of not supporting them in their religious war (Paine, 41).
Laura buys the goblin fruit with "a precious golden lock" of her hair and "a tear more rare than pearl," and once she consumes it, she pays the price again as her body dwindles and her will is sapped by inanition (11.
Hastily vetted and approved--at Roosevelts urging--by Britain and America at the second Quebec conference in summer 1944, the plan died a slow death by inanition, as Americans and Europeans realized over the next year, while Stalin's Red Army occupied eastern Europe, that only resuscitation of a strong, democratic nation in the western half of Germany, including the rebuilding of her industrial might, could prevent Soviet domination of the continent.
Conversely, during inanition or intracellular energy reduction (with AMPK activation), or in the presence of mTOR inhibitors, ATC proteins can be recruited to form a complex that will initiate autophagy [128].
In any event, Cambridge had so few Christians dons at the time that "the debate died of inanition" (34).
As the swelling increases in size, it becomes difficult for animal for prehension, mastication and shows signs like ptyalism, open mouth with protruded tongue, sub mandibular swelling and inanition which were also observed by Sagar et al.
The syndrome includes inanition, weight loss, and death in many affected birds.
It seems to be Lucy's very illness, exacerbated in part by inanition in the face of isolation, that gains her the help she needs.
"Where there is no vision the people perish" is a slogan often to be heard today; though most of those who repeat it seem to take it for granted that the prospering of the "people" is itself the primary and proper object of the "vision." Anyhow, I may not be far wrong in assuming that a danger deeper and more dismal is inherent in spiritual inanition and levelling than the boredom and dissatisfaction of a tiny "minority" of refined intellectuals.
One of the main problems related to this issue was inanition, either because the scorpion rejected the prey, or because the use of the wrong size of prey to feed the animals.
Bacteria have a great potential to respond to stressing factors, be it competition between microorganisms or environmental fluctuations, such as sudden changes in temperature, low activity in water, inanition, oxydative stress, etc (Stewart, 2002).