incandescence


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Incandescence

The emission of visible radiation by a hot body. A theoretically perfect radiator, called a blackbody, will emit radiant energy according to Planck's radiation law at any temperature. Prediction of the visual brightness requires additional consideration of the sensitivity of the eye, and the radiation will be visible only for temperatures of the blackbody which are above some minimum. The relation between brightness and temperature is plotted in the illustration. As shown, the minimum tem-perature for incandescence for the dark-adapted eye is about 390°C (730°F). Under these ideal observing conditions, the incandescence appears as a colorless glow. The dull red light commonly associated with incandescence of objects in a lighted room requires a temperature of about 500°C (930°F). See Blackbody, Heat radiation

Relation between brightness of blackbody and temperatureenlarge picture
Relation between brightness of blackbody and temperature

incandescence

[‚in·kən′des·əns]
(optics)
The emission of visible radiation by a hot body.

incandescence

The emission of visible light as a result of heating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leipertz, "Two-dimensional soot-particle sizing by time-resolved laser-induced incandescence," Optics Expresss, vol.
The regions where bright soot incandescence is observed, primarily near the piston bowl-wall, must be fuel-rich for soot to form.
The publisher's publicity release for this book states: "Without neon, Las Vegas might still be a sleepy desert town in Nevada and Times Square merely another busy intersection in New York City." Ribbat knows that incandescence, not neon, transformed Times Square into a place famous for its lights.
Beginning his article with the 1809 epigraph above, articulating Blake's concept of art centred on invention and visionary conception, Archer ended it in his own words: "In the best art there is an inescapable element of strangeness, the sense of a novel wonder, a mystery burning at the heart of life, and it is this strangeness, this incandescence which above all the painting of Mithila transmits."
O'Leary narrates the life cycle of existence from "an unatomized sundering of sames" to an "organized whole in the process of fulfillment," an odyssey and Archimedean sensibility deriving from Teilhard's theory that human consciousness exists in nature as an incandescence, which en masse produces a psychic brightness that sheathes the planet in a "phosphorescence of thought."
Around about 80% of homicides are committed by first offenders frequently during a bout of uncontrolled incandescence generating moments of unprecedented behaviour they will spend a lifetime regretting.
Thankfully, David Cameron - a man who would annoy me even if he was handing me bars of gold bullion - is always capable of taking me to the next level of incandescence.
Cenapred said: "During the night, moderate to intense incandescence could be observed over the crater, as well as the emission of a continuous plume, reaching 1km high, with denser pulses containing small amounts of ash.
There are two ways in which light is produced for the purpose of illuminated lighting: incandescence or luminescence.
The late 19th century also saw the invention of the gas mantle, whereby light output was improved by bringing a solid material to incandescence within the flame.
incandescence overhead and our starved young lives were mercifully fed
For those who have seen the film version of Brooks' "Young Frankenstein," Reslock might well put you in mind of Terri Garr's memorable Inga, with her blonde incandescence and perky Scandinavian accent.