incandescence

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Incandescence

The emission of visible radiation by a hot body. A theoretically perfect radiator, called a blackbody, will emit radiant energy according to Planck's radiation law at any temperature. Prediction of the visual brightness requires additional consideration of the sensitivity of the eye, and the radiation will be visible only for temperatures of the blackbody which are above some minimum. The relation between brightness and temperature is plotted in the illustration. As shown, the minimum tem-perature for incandescence for the dark-adapted eye is about 390°C (730°F). Under these ideal observing conditions, the incandescence appears as a colorless glow. The dull red light commonly associated with incandescence of objects in a lighted room requires a temperature of about 500°C (930°F). See Blackbody, Heat radiation

Relation between brightness of blackbody and temperatureenlarge picture
Relation between brightness of blackbody and temperature

incandescence

[‚in·kən′des·əns]
(optics)
The emission of visible radiation by a hot body.

incandescence

The emission of visible light as a result of heating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Philips has an annual production capacity to produce 150 million units of incandescent lamps, 30 million units of TL and 2 million units of CL.
Incandescent bulbs last just 1,200 hours; compact fluorescents, 8,000 hours.
With better aesthetics, filament LEDs could help speed the switch from the 7 billion incandescent lamps still lighting the planet.
Far from being a spontaneous grassroots movement in favor of more energy efficiency, the eradication of incandescent light bulbs is actually being coordinated by a little-known initiative called en.lighten, run by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), in coordination with the Global Environment Facility (GEF), a powerful but little-known organization set up at the 1992 Rio Earth Summit.
"A market study has also showed that in a seven-year period it would cost approximately BD144 to keep replacing incandescent bulbs, whereas it would only cost BD26 for LEDs, so there are huge savings to be made there too."
Illuminated Christmas trees became popular during the late 18th century--before the advent of incandescent lights, these were often lit with candles resting on the branches (although this obviously posed a series of safety hazards!).
Incandescent bulbs all have the same basic qualities, and this is the level of performance any replacement bulb is expected to meet:
Explaining the system, Osama said: "The Operations Room officer controls the incandescent street light from a safe area ahead of the traffic accident's location, 20 seconds after receiving notification on the 999 number, indicating that a traffic accident had occurred.
"The Operations Room officer controls the incandescent street light from a safe area ahead of the traffic accident's location, twenty seconds after receiving notification on the 999 number, indicating that a traffic accident had occurred.
Officials add it has the same dimensions as a traditional incandescent bulb with a smooth heatsink making it look less like an LED and more like a true incandescent.
Soon incandescent bulbs won't be an option, but it's unclear how that will affect consumers.
The incandescent was one of the earliest evolution of lightbulbs as we know today.