incident light

incident light

[′in·sə·dənt ¦līt]
(optics)
The direct light that falls on a surface.

incident light

In computer graphics, light that strikes an object. The color of the object is based on how the light is absorbed or reflected by the object. See ambient lighting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Device specifications the device should have at least the following specifications or comparable specifications: - transmitted light microscopy and documentation with a digital color camera, - incident light fluorescence microscopy and documentation with a digital black and white camera, - confocal microscopy and documentation with a digital black and white camera, - minimum of contamination possibilities, - collection of single cells (at least 2 m) directly from the culture dish / slide.
It employs an innovative nanomaterial structure that absorbs virtually all incident light.
The modification raises the proportion of the incident light that is reflected by a surface, as well as the refractive properties at the boundary between the modified and unmodified air.
9,465,221 describes a digital camera with a light splitter cube that receives incident light from a camera scene.
2] are refraction indices of medium that light is originating from and of medium from which light is exiting, respectively and knowing the sinus of incident light [[theta].
Following this, non-sequential optical simulation studies were performed analyzing the effect of incident light orientation.
These holograms use nanostructures that are sensitive to polarization (the direction in which light vibrates) to produce different images depending on the polarization of incident light.
2) Visible and near-infrared incident light with wavelength between 380 and 1400 nm damages the retina.
An achromatic lens is one that does not disperse, or break apart incident light rays into constituent colours.
As far as possible, lenses should transmit all the incident light.
Using this method, our ultra-thin coating of nano-textured fewlayer graphene absorbs 95 per cent of incident light across a broad spectrum, from the UV to the infrared.
If the sample is excited it emits heat pulses of same frequency as that of incident light.

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