incident wave

incident wave

[′in·sə·dənt ¦wāv]
(electronics)
A current or voltage wave that is traveling through a transmission line in the direction from source to load.
(physics)
A wave that impinges on a discontinuity, particle, or body, or on a medium having different propagation characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is caused by the angle of the incident wave at the initial condition both at low tide and high tide is equivalent, which is 2400 from the Northwest, based on the measurement result.
To this end, incident angle [theta] is defined as those formed between the propagation vector of the incident wave and the z-axis over xz-plane.
Indeed, thin films often demonstrate resonant behaviour that leads to strong angular and wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficient; severely absorbing material with large imaginary part of the permittivity (able to absorb the radiation in small volume) strongly reflects the incident wave. These contradictions make it difficult to design an absorber.
When the frequency of the incident wave increases to 32.6 GHz, the induced current has the same direction as that of the ground plane, which constitutes an equivalent electric resonator.
Combing the above research findings, this study input the test parameters and incident wave of the modified SHPB tests into the altered thin-layer interface model, and the effects of geometrical parameters of the joint on wave transmission and energy dissipation were analyzed.
When a wave train of a particular mode interacts with an obstacle, it may happen that the incident wave is partially reflected and also partially transmitted into waves of both modes.
where [I.sub.0] is the intensity of the initial wave, [theta] is the scattering angle, and [phi] is the angle between the propagating direction of the scattered wave and the direction of the electric field accompanying the incident wave.
The relation between the incident wave and the diffracted wave is one-to-many, while the relation between the incident wave and the reflected wave is that one-to-one, as shown in Figure 1.
It has been obtained that a real part of the Poynting vector normal component of a wave propagating in an anisotropic medium is not equal to zero when an incident wave propagates tangentially to an interface between the media.
where k and [omega] are the wave number and the angular frequency of the incident wave, respectively.
This reflected wave is related to the incident wave by representation in the following equation:
From Figure 2(b), compared with the uniform cross-section pile, the peak values of incident wave signals and preliminary orthokinetic reflected signals from pile end in the reflected wave signal curves of pile with necking segment at pile head become smaller, and the larger the necking degree of variable cross-section segment, the larger the reducing degree of peak value.

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