incinerator


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Related to incinerator: Medical Waste Incinerator

incinerator,

furnace for burning refuse. The older and simpler kind of incinerator was a brick-lined cell with a metal grate over a lower ash pit, with one opening in the top or side for loading and another opening in the side for removing incombustible masses called clinkers. Many small incinerators formerly found in apartment houses have now been replaced by trash compacters. The rotary-kiln incinerator used by municipalities and by large factories has a long, slightly inclined passageway through which refuse is moved continuously. In the first section the refuse is dried on moving steps, then moved onto a rocking grate where it is ignited and partially burned. The third and last section is a refractory-lined cylinder where combustion is completed. Clinkers spill out at the end. The heat from the incinerator generates steam in a boiler, producing as much as 100 megawatts of electricity. A high stack, fan, or steam jet supplied from the boiler supplies a draft. Ash drops through the grate, but many particles are carried along with the hot gases. These particles and volatile gases are burned in a combustion chamber fed by several furnaces. In order to control air pollution, the remaining gases are further treated, with acid gas scrubbers to control sulfuric and nitric acid emissions, and baghouses to remove all remaining dust particles, before they are released into the environment.

incinerator

[in′sin·ə‚rād·ər]
(engineering)
A furnace or other container in which materials are burned.

incinerator

An apparatus in which solid, semisolid, or gaseous combustible wastes are ignited and burned.
References in periodicals archive ?
The EPA notes that there are "wet" systems such as scrubbers and fabric filter systems (with and without carbon injection) that can be used in control emissions from medical waste incinerators and compares the performance capabilities of each.
In the past, noted, Dan Margulies, executive director of the Community Housing Improvement Program, that law has always been understood to mean that when you remove the incinerator from a building of 42 units or more it needed to be replaced with a compactor, while buildings with 21 to 42 units could apply for the waiver.
But the uncertainty of what will spew from an improperly equipped incinerator remains a major factor behind the growth of the anti-PVC sentiment abroad and a driving force behind the grassroots effort here.
a leading manufacturer of poultry heaters, nests and incinerators, as well as certain commercial heating products.
Global Incinerator Market 2015-2019 market report spreads across 61 pages and provides 20 Figures to support the market research.
The Coquitlam Mayor, Richard Stewart asked Metro Vancouver for a comprehensive assessment of the risks and financial implications of a new waste-to-energy incinerator.
WTE plants produce emissions just like solid waste incinerators do, opponents insist.
After almost two years of research, during which the incinerator was demolished, they concluded that no link could be found.
The law proposed as a counter-measure "would pretty much ban any incinerators of C&D wood from being established in the state," according to William Turley of the Construction Materials Recycling Association, Lisle, Ill.
but whether or not Lynda Ryan was alive or dead when she was pushed into the incinerator only Martin Ryan knows.
However, the city isn't ready to take any action against the owner of the incinerator or the installer, Grile said.
The Dublin High Court ruled that they were entitled to have a judicial review of South Tipperary County Council's decision to grant planning permission to National By-Products to build the incinerator at Rosegreen.